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  • Question 1/10

    Chewing gum can make you gassy.

  • Answer 1/10

    Chewing gum can make you gassy.

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    Any time you swallow air, it can lead to farts. Eating or drinking too fast, fizzy drinks, smoking, and chewing gum can make you do it. But the main cause is the breakdown of food in your gut. The medical name for it is flatulence.

  • Question 1/10

    Air travel can make you fart.

  • Answer 1/10

    Air travel can make you fart.

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    • Correct Answer:

    The change in air pressure can affect more than your ears. To help keep embarrassing gas at bay, watch what you eat before and during your flight. If you know a certain food, like beans, makes you gassy, don't eat it.

     

    Still worried? You could try underwear lined with carbon. There are several brands available, and they are designed to help filter fart odors.

  • Question 1/10

      The older you get, the gassier you’ll become.

  • Answer 1/10

      The older you get, the gassier you’ll become.

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    Ah, aging! As the years go by, your digestive system slows down. You may get constipated, and being backed up can make you gassy. Some laxatives that help with constipation can cause gas, like ones that contain bran.

  • Question 1/10

    How many times a day does a person on a normal diet pass gas?

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    Answer 1/10

    How many times a day does a person on a normal diet pass gas?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Whether through burping or farting, your digestive system stays pretty busy. If you find yourself more gassy than normal, it’s most likely something you ate. Don’t worry. It should pass.

  • Question 1/10

      Bad-smelling farts mean you are sick.

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    Answer 1/10

      Bad-smelling farts mean you are sick.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Most farts are odorless, but everyone passes smelly gas from time to time. The odor is usually caused by sulfur in your system, and it’s rarely a reason for concern.

     

    But if it doesn’t clear up and you have other symptoms, like stomach pain, check with your doctor. You could have an infection. Or you may not be able to digest the lactose in dairy products. Or you could have celiac disease -- problems digesting gluten -- which is found in wheat and other grains. Your doctor may recommend diet changes and supplements, or prescribe medication to help.

  • Question 1/10

    Foods that are high in this are more likely to make you fart:

  • Answer 1/10

    Foods that are high in this are more likely to make you fart:

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    Everyone is different, and foods that cause gas for one person may not for someone else. But in general, foods that are high in carbs cause more gas.

     

    High-fat foods stay in the stomach longer. Cutting back on them can help reduce bloating and discomfort. Less fat helps the stomach empty faster, allowing gas to move more quickly out of you.

     

    In general, protein doesn’t contribute to gas, but if you have problems digesting lactose, a sugar in milk, dairy products will give you gas.

  • Answer 1/10

    Dietary supplements (like Beano and Gastro) prevent gas because they:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    These little pills give your digestive juices a boost. They contain natural tools called enzymes that help break down your food. Take these before you eat to help with gas.

  • Question 1/10

    The best way to get rid of the smell of a fart is:

  • Answer 1/10

    The best way to get rid of the smell of a fart is:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Open a window and let the fart smell float away into fresh air. Lighting matches, spraying perfume, and using air fresheners may cover the fart scent, but they don’t get rid of it. 

     

  • Question 1/10

      Exercise can help you fart less.

  • Answer 1/10

      Exercise can help you fart less.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Working out will help get rid of any extra air in your system. To help with the amount of gas you pass, do regular exercise. Try this: Tighten your stomach muscles by pulling them in. Imagine you’re pulling your belly button towards your spine. Over time you’ll strengthen those muscles and they can help disguise a gassy pooch.

  • Answer 1/10

    You feel a fart coming on, and you aren’t alone. It’s best to:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you can’t make it out of the room, don’t clench. Any kind of pushing is going to amplify the sound if it sneaks out. Standing will produce less bang than sitting.

     

    While it may be polite to stifle a fart, you’ll likely feel better if you let your flatulence fly.

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

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    Time to toot your horn. When it comes to farts, you really know your stuff. 

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    You get the pass on gas. You know the basics about farts, but you’re still learning.  

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    When it comes to the facts on farting, you’re not an expert yet. Try again.

Sources | Reviewed by William Blahd, MD on February 08, 2016 Medically Reviewed on February 08, 2016

Reviewed by William Blahd, MD on
February 08, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Oliver Brandt

SOURCES:

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: “Gas in the Digestive Tract.” 

Medline Plus: “Gas.”  

The Nature Conservancy, Planet Change: “No Fooling: Cow Burps and Farts Contribute to Climate Change.”

Greenhouse Gas Online: “Methane Sources – Termites.”

Think Global Green: “Methane.”

United States Environmental Protection Agency, Climate Change: “Overview of Greenhouse Gases.”

Pommergaard, H. The New Zealand Medical Journal , February 2013.

Suarez, F. Gut, July 1998.

NutritionFacts.org: “Beans and Gas: Clearing the Air.”

UpToDate: “Patient Information: Gas and bloating (Beyond the Basics).”

Utah Digestive Health Institute: “Tips to Help Control Gas and Bloating.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine, Health Alerts, Digestive Health Special Report: “You’ve Got Gas and What You Can Do About It.”

Salon: “Dr. Fart Speaks.”  

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.