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  • Question 1/9

    An aspirin a day keeps the _____ away.

  • Answer 1/9

    An aspirin a day keeps the _____ away.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    One thing aspirin does is interrupt the process that makes your blood clot. Taking one every day helps keep your blood flowing smoothly and helps prevent blockages in your blood vessels that can lead to strokes and heart attacks. Talk to your doctor about whether it's a good idea for you.

  • Question 1/9

    Regular aspirin use may help women avoid:

  • Answer 1/9

    Regular aspirin use may help women avoid:

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    • Correct Answer:

    A study found that women who took at least two aspirin a week had a 40% lower risk of Parkinson's. Researchers aren't sure why. Maybe it's because women tend to take higher doses for arthritis and headaches than men take for heart problems.

  • Question 1/9

    Aspirin was developed in the:

  • Answer 1/9

    Aspirin was developed in the:

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    • Correct Answer:

    As far back as 1500 B.C., people were hip to the medicinal powers of the willow bark plant. But it wasn't until the 1800s that scientists figured out which part of that plant was doing the healing. In 1897, a scientist used a new form of the drug to treat his father's rheumatism. And the aspirin we know today -- acetylsalicylic acid -- was born.

  • Question 1/9

    Don't give a child with the flu aspirin because it can:

  • Answer 1/9

    Don't give a child with the flu aspirin because it can:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Aspirin is a no-no for kids who have a fever or a viral infection like the flu. It's linked to Reye syndrome, a serious condition with symptoms like vomiting, confusion, and being overstimulated. It causes swelling in the brain and liver and may lead to a coma.

    Until age 19, you're usually better off reaching for acetaminophen or ibuprofen, unless your doctor specifically says to use aspirin.

  • Question 1/9

    About how many older adults in the U.S. take aspirin every day?

  • Answer 1/9

    About how many older adults in the U.S. take aspirin every day?

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    The No. 1 reason over half of people over age 65 pop these pills is to help prevent a heart attack.

  • Question 1/9

    Is it safe to take aspirin another way, besides swallowing it?

  • Answer 1/9

    Is it safe to take aspirin another way, besides swallowing it?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Aspirin comes in different forms: tablets, powder, gum -- and as a suppository.

    It's probably easiest to take it by mouth, but it affects your body the same, no matter how it gets in there. Follow the directions on the package.

  • Question 1/9

    Too much aspirin could cause:

  • Answer 1/9

    Too much aspirin could cause:

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    • Correct Answer:

    High doses can cause tinnitus. The ringing should go away once you stop taking the medicine.

    The most common side effect is a tummy ache. Eat something before you take a dose to help avoid that.

    It's possible to have an allergic reaction to aspirin, but it's rare.

  • Question 1/9

    You can take aspirin for a headache when you're pregnant.

  • Answer 1/9

    You can take aspirin for a headache when you're pregnant.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    For moms-to-be, acetaminophen is a better choice for pain relief.

    But if you're at high risk for preeclampsia, your doctor will probably recommend a low dose of aspirin to help prevent high blood pressure and protein in your urine.

    Since aspirin can cause extra bleeding during labor, you shouldn't take it during the last 6-8 weeks you're pregnant unless your doctor told you to.

  • Question 1/9

    Dissolve aspirin in your water to give it added zing when you:

  • Answer 1/9

    Dissolve aspirin in your water to give it added zing when you:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Who knew? Aspirin can be good medicine for plants, too. A solution of one and a half tablets in 2 gallons of water sprayed on your garden every 3 weeks can give you more and bigger veggies. The key ingredient, salicylic acid, bumps up plant growth and helps protect them from disease.

    Other reported fixes with aspirin -- making a paste for acne or bee stings, protecting your hair from chlorine, boosting your car battery -- don't have the science to back them up.

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

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    You swallowed that quiz whole. You're an aspirin ace!

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    Pretty good. But a spoonful of info could help the wrong answers go down the right way.

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    No pain, no gain. Enjoy your newfound aspirin knowledge!

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on January 03, 2017 Medically Reviewed on January 03, 2017

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
January 03, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

Raju, M. American Journal of Medicine , 2011.

Wahner, A. Neurology , Nov. 6, 2007.

Fuster, V. Circulation , 2011.

Beutler, A. American Family Physician , Dec. 15, 2009.

Oregon State University: "Survey shows half of older adults in U.S. now taking aspirin."

Williams, C. American Journal of Preventative Medicine , May 2015.

MedlinePlus: "Aspirin."

Guitton, M. The Journal of Neuroscience , 2003.

Paikin, J. Circulation , 2012.

Berkeley Wellness: "'Take with Food' Labels on Drugs."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Daily Low-dose Aspirin Recommended for Pregnant Women at High Risk for Pre-eclampsia," "NSAID Prescribing Precautions."

Mayo Clinic: "Is it safe to take aspirin during pregnancy?"

National Gardening Association: "Aspirin for your Garden."

Harvard Medical School: "Drug Expiration Dates -- Do They Mean Anything?"

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