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How are liver lesions treated?

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If you don’t have any symptoms, you may not need to do anything about the lesion. If it’s causing issues for you but it’s not cancerous, your doctor may recommend surgery to take it out and ease your symptoms.

If the lesion is cancerous, you might need one or more of these:

Chemotherapy. This is a combination of powerful drugs designed to kill cancer cells. It’s the most common treatment for liver lesions that are spreading to other parts of your body.

Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). This is a targeted type of chemotherapy that takes anti-cancer drugs directly to the lesion. They flow through a tiny tube called a catheter into the artery that brings blood to your liver. This also blocks some of the blood flow to your liver, which keeps the cancer cells from getting the oxygen they need to grow. TACE causes fewer side effects than regular chemotherapy.

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA). If your lesion is small, your doctor may recommend this procedure. He’ll guide a small probe into the tumor in your liver, usually through tiny cuts in your belly. The probe will give off a certain kind of energy that heats up and kills cancerous cells.

From: What Are Liver Lesions? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Liver Association: “Benign Liver Tumors.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Malignant Hepatic Lesions.”

California Pacific Medical Center: “Metastatic Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment,” “Non-Cancerous Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “Liver Cancer Prevention & Risk Factors.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 27, 2017

SOURCES:

American Liver Association: “Benign Liver Tumors.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Malignant Hepatic Lesions.”

California Pacific Medical Center: “Metastatic Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment,” “Non-Cancerous Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “Liver Cancer Prevention & Risk Factors.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 27, 2017

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