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What causes breathing problems?

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There are many causes of breathing problems. Some people have difficulty breathing when they get a cold. Others have trouble breathing because of occasional bouts of acute sinusitis. Sinusitis can make it difficult to breathe through your nose for a week or two until the inflammation subsides and the congested sinuses begin to drain. Many breathing problems are chronic or long-term. These common breathing problems include chronic sinusitis, allergies, and asthma. These problems can cause a host of symptoms such as nasal congestion, runny nose, itchy or watery eyes, chest congestion, cough, wheezing, labored breathing, and shallow breathing. The nasal passage is a pathway for viruses and allergens to enter your lungs. So the nose and sinuses are often associated with many lung disorders. A sinus or nasal passage inflammation may trigger reflexes and cause asthma attacks. And the No. 1 trigger for asthma is allergies.

SOURCES: American Lung Association: "What is Hay Fever?" American Lung Association: "Lung Disease." American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: "Tips to Remember: What is Allergy Testing?" MedlinePlus: "Pulmonary Function Tests." American Lung Association: "Asthma Facts." American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: "Rhinitis and Sinusitis."





Reviewed by William Blahd on July 14, 2017

SOURCES: American Lung Association: "What is Hay Fever?" American Lung Association: "Lung Disease." American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: "Tips to Remember: What is Allergy Testing?" MedlinePlus: "Pulmonary Function Tests." American Lung Association: "Asthma Facts." American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: "Rhinitis and Sinusitis."





Reviewed by William Blahd on July 14, 2017

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How common are breathing problems?

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