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  • Question 1/10

    The shape of your eyes may change during menopause.

  • Answer 1/10

    The shape of your eyes may change during menopause.

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    The change is likely small, but it may be noticeable to you. You also may find that your contacts don’t feel right anymore or your vision isn’t what it used to be. Some women have problems with dry or scratchy eyes after menopause.

  • Question 1/10

    The average woman weighs this much more after menopause:  

  • Answer 1/10

    The average woman weighs this much more after menopause:  

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    Because you make less of the hormone estrogen, your body might change how and where it stores fat.  A little extra weight may show up -- and stick around -- in your lower tummy area. It won’t cause any major health problems, but you’ll probably need to work a little harder to lose it.

  • Question 1/10

    Your bra may not fit well anymore. 

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    Your bra may not fit well anymore. 

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    It’s normal for your breasts to change shape, lose their firmness, or shrink after menopause. It’s not unusual to lose a cup size or more as you get older.  

  • Question 1/10

    You start losing this quickly about a year before your last period:

  • Answer 1/10

    You start losing this quickly about a year before your last period:

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    Estrogen helps keep your bones in good shape. Around age 35, women’s bones start to get thinner and weaker, and this process speeds up during and after menopause.  Weaker bones are more likely to break, so talk with your doctor about taking a calcium supplement or other things you can do to keep them healthy such as exercise, getting good nutrition and vitamin D, and not smoking.  

  • Question 1/10

    Menopause can change the shape of your body.

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    Menopause can change the shape of your body.

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    Before menopause, many women have a pear-shaped body -- wide hips and thighs and more weight below the waist. During midlife, that can change to more of an apple shape as your weight shifts to your waist and belly.

  • Question 1/10

    You may pee more often.

  • Answer 1/10

    You may pee more often.

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    The lining of your urethra -- the tube that carries urine from your bladder out of your body when you pee -- gets drier, thinner, and less elastic. That can make you feel like you need to pee more. You also may leak urine when you cough, laugh, or lift heavy things. Your doctor can recommend exercises to train and strengthen the muscles in that area.

  • Question 1/10

    You won’t have a good sex life after “the change.”

  • Answer 1/10

    You won’t have a good sex life after “the change.”

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    It’s common to have vaginal dryness during and after menopause, and the lack of estrogen can make your vagina less stretchy. But vaginal moisturizers and estrogen therapy can help, and regular sex boosts blood flow and keeps your vaginal muscles toned. Some women say they have a better sex life after menopause because they’re not worried about getting pregnant.

  • Question 1/10

    Your risk of heart disease may be higher because you have less estrogen after menopause.

  • Answer 1/10

    Your risk of heart disease may be higher because you have less estrogen after menopause.

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    Your chances of a heart attack, stroke, or other heart-related problems may go up when your levels of this hormone go down. That’s especially true if you had your ovaries removed or you went through menopause at a young age. Do what you can to keep your heart healthy: Get plenty of exercise, eat a well-balanced diet, and stay away from cigarettes.

  • Question 1/10

    Menopause can affect your mood. 

  • Answer 1/10

    Menopause can affect your mood. 

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    The change in hormones after menopause can bring about changes in your mood. So, too, can the idea of growing older and watching your body change. Talk to your doctor if you’re concerned -- she may suggest hormone therapy or antidepressants.

  • Answer 1/10

    You may need to do this more often:

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    Your skin is your largest and most visible organ -- and menopause can make it dry and itchy. You can help your skin by using sunscreen and moisturizer. Also, drink plenty of water, and if you smoke, quit.

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Sources | Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on January 21, 2020 Medically Reviewed on January 21, 2020

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on
January 21, 2020

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1)Thinkstock Photos

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Menopause & Sex.”

Harvard Health: “Dealing with the Symptoms of Menopause.”

Kidshealth.org: “Your Urinary System.”

NHS: “Breast Changes in Older Women,” “Menopause: The Facts.”

Northwestern University: "How Hormone Depletion Affects You."

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Osteoporosis.”

The American Heart Association: “The American Heart Association’s Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations.”

The North American Menopause Society: “Changes in Weight and Fat Distribution,” “Menopause and Eye Health,” “Menopause FAQs: Understanding the Symptoms,” “Sexual Health and Menopause,” “Symptoms of Menopause,” “Urinary Incontinence.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Brain Fog of Menopause Confirmed."

National Womens Health Resource Center: "Menopause and Your Changing Body."

 

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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