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What is the He Gu or L14 pressure point?

ANSWER

He Gu, or LI4 -- short for large intestine 4 -- is a point on your hand that can be targeted to relieve headaches, stress, neck pain, and more. You’ll find it in the thick part of the muscle between your thumb and index finger. Don’t massage here if you’re pregnant -- it could induce labor.

Migraine Research Foundation: “Migraine Facts.”

UC San Diego Center for Integrative Medicine: “How Acupuncture Can Relieve Pain and Improve Sleep."

British Acupuncture Council: “Migraines.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Exercising to relax.”

Hawaii Medical Journal : “Understanding Endorphins and Their Importance in Pain Management.”

Canadian Medical Association Journal : “The role of acupuncture in the treatment of migraine.”

JAMA Internal Medicine : “Acupuncture for Migraine Prevention: Still Reaching for Convincing Evidence.”

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine : “Sham acupuncture may be as efficacious as true acupuncture: a systematic review of clinical trials.”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Acupuncture: In Depth.”

UCLA Center for East-West Medicine: “Acupressure for Beginners,” “Acupressure for Headache or Neck and Shoulder Tension,” “Acupressure Point GB20: Gallbladder 20 or Feng Chi (Wind Pool),” “Acupressure Point GB21: Gallbladder 21 or Jian Jing,” “Acupressure Point LI4: Large Intestine 6 or He Gu,” “Acupressure Point TE3: Triple Energizer 3 or Zhong Zhu (Central Islet).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Can An Unconventional Piercing Rid You of Migraine Pain?”

Minnesota Physical Medicine Blog by Dr. Thomas Cohn: “Headaches, Daith Piercings, and the Vagus Nerve.”

The Migraine Trust: “Hot topic: Daith piercing.”

Reviewed by Stephen D. Silberstein on July 17, 2017

Migraine Research Foundation: “Migraine Facts.”

UC San Diego Center for Integrative Medicine: “How Acupuncture Can Relieve Pain and Improve Sleep."

British Acupuncture Council: “Migraines.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Exercising to relax.”

Hawaii Medical Journal : “Understanding Endorphins and Their Importance in Pain Management.”

Canadian Medical Association Journal : “The role of acupuncture in the treatment of migraine.”

JAMA Internal Medicine : “Acupuncture for Migraine Prevention: Still Reaching for Convincing Evidence.”

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine : “Sham acupuncture may be as efficacious as true acupuncture: a systematic review of clinical trials.”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Acupuncture: In Depth.”

UCLA Center for East-West Medicine: “Acupressure for Beginners,” “Acupressure for Headache or Neck and Shoulder Tension,” “Acupressure Point GB20: Gallbladder 20 or Feng Chi (Wind Pool),” “Acupressure Point GB21: Gallbladder 21 or Jian Jing,” “Acupressure Point LI4: Large Intestine 6 or He Gu,” “Acupressure Point TE3: Triple Energizer 3 or Zhong Zhu (Central Islet).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Can An Unconventional Piercing Rid You of Migraine Pain?”

Minnesota Physical Medicine Blog by Dr. Thomas Cohn: “Headaches, Daith Piercings, and the Vagus Nerve.”

The Migraine Trust: “Hot topic: Daith piercing.”

Reviewed by Stephen D. Silberstein on July 17, 2017

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What relaxation techniques are used to treat headaches?

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