Chasteberry

Chasteberry is a fruit that grows on flowering shrubs near riverbanks in parts of Asia and the Mediterranean. The fruit is dried and put into:

  • Liquids
  • Capsules
  • Tablets

Chasteberry is also sometimes called Monk's pepper.

Can you get chasteberry naturally from foods?

Chasteberry supplements are made from the dried fruit of the chasteberry tree. It is manufactured in pill or liquid form.

What are the risks of taking chasteberry?

No serious side effects of chasteberry have been reported.

The side effects of chasteberry may include:

Chasteberry can affect levels of hormones that play a key role in pregnancy, breastfeeding, menstruation, and even some breast cancers. You should not take chasteberry if you:

Chasteberry may interfere with medicines that affect levels of a brain substance called dopamine. Do not take chasteberry if you take:

Always tell your doctor about any supplements you are taking, including natural ones and those bought without a prescription. That way, your doctor can check on any potential side effects or interactions with any medications.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does regulate dietary supplements; however, it treats them like foods rather than medications. Unlike drug manufacturers, the makers of supplements don’t have to show their products are safe or effective before selling them on the market.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, DO, MS on February 11, 2019

Sources

SOURCES:

Vigod, S. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, June 2010.

Schellenberg, R.  British Medical Journal, 2001.

Wang, Y.J. Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, Feb. 1, 2011.

Ferri, F.F., editor, Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2013, 1st edition, Mosby Elsevier; 2012.

van Die, M.D. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 2009.

Biggs, W. American Family Physician, Oct. 15, 2011.

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: "Chasteberry."

Natural Standard: "Chasteberry."

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