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  • Question 1/14

    How long does the typical period last?

  • Answer 1/14

    How long does the typical period last?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    While 3-5 days is most common, anywhere between 2 and 7 days is considered normal. See your doctor if your period lasts longer than a week or suddenly changes from what's regular for you.

  • Question 1/14

    How much blood does the average woman lose during each period?

  • Answer 1/14

    How much blood does the average woman lose during each period?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    While you can't easily measure blood loss, most women know when their menstrual flow is heavy. If flow seems excessive, is soaking a pad or tampon every hour for several hours, or you see large clots, tell your doctor.

  • Question 1/14

    If you miss a period, you're either pregnant or something's wrong.

  • Answer 1/14

    If you miss a period, you're either pregnant or something's wrong.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Missed or delayed periods are common in young women, especially in the early years of menstruation, and things like stress, weight loss, and too much exercise can make periods irregular.

     

    Also, several birth control methods can cause periods to stop and can even be designed for just that purpose. Talk to your doctor if you're normally regular but start skipping periods.

  • Question 1/14

    When your period starts, it's normal to feel pain in:

  • Answer 1/14

    When your period starts, it's normal to feel pain in:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    But very intense or lasting pain should be reported to your doctor. Lasting pain in the pelvic area can be a symptom of more serious problems, such as endometriosis -- the growth outside the uterus, usually into the pelvic cavity, of tissue that normally lines the uterus.

  • Question 1/14

    It's a fact that women who live together have their periods at the same time.

  • Answer 1/14

    It's a fact that women who live together have their periods at the same time.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Although many of us believe it, research findings on "menstrual synchrony" have varied, and no scientific consensus has been reached.

  • Question 1/14

    How long is a normal menstrual cycle?

  • Answer 1/14

    How long is a normal menstrual cycle?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    For most women, periods usually occur from 21 to 35 days apart. In young girls and teenagers, periods are commonly irregular and have cycles ranging between 21 and 45 days. Keep track of your periods on a calendar (which can help you and your doctor determine what pattern is normal for you).

  • Question 1/14

    What might make your period feel worse?

  • Answer 1/14

    What might make your period feel worse?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A 2010 study found that women who reported feeling highly stressed were more than twice as likely to report having at least five moderate to severe symptoms with their periods as women with lower stress.

  • Question 1/14

    What percentage of U.S. women in a 2005 survey said that in some ways, they enjoy their periods?

  • Answer 1/14

    What percentage of U.S. women in a 2005 survey said that in some ways, they enjoy their periods?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Almost three-quarters of the women who responded disagreed or disagreed strongly.

  • Question 1/14

    About how many periods will you have in your life?

  • Answer 1/14

    About how many periods will you have in your life?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    That's roughly 35 years of periods, with an average of 13 menstrual cycles a year.

  • Question 1/14

    Bleeding between periods is always a sign that something's wrong.

  • Answer 1/14

    Bleeding between periods is always a sign that something's wrong.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    But you should see your doctor promptly so he or she can determine the cause. Bleeding between periods can have a number of causes, only some of them serious.

  • Question 1/14

    It's normal to pass clumps or clots of blood during your period.

  • Answer 1/14

    It's normal to pass clumps or clots of blood during your period.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Many women pass clumps of blood, or clots, from time to time, especially on heavy-flow days. If clots are large or if you are soaking through a pad or tampon every hour for 2 or 3 hours, call your doctor.

  • Question 1/14

    You can't get pregnant during your period.

  • Answer 1/14

    You can't get pregnant during your period.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Women can get pregnant at any time during their menstrual cycle, although it is most likely when ovulation occurs, 10-16 days before the next period.

     

    Although some women worry that sex during their period is unhealthy, it's perfectly OK if both partners are healthy and are practicing safe sex in a monogamous relationship.

  • Question 1/14

    It's normal to see brown blood in your period.

  • Answer 1/14

    It's normal to see brown blood in your period.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Blood colors ranging from bright red to deep brown are normal, and different colors can occur over the course of the same period.

  • Question 1/14

    What might help relieve PMS symptoms?

  • Answer 1/14

    What might help relieve PMS symptoms?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Many women find that regular aerobic exercise, such as a half-hour of cycling, brisk walking, or running most days of the week, can ease PMS symptoms. Calcium-rich foods and complex carbohydrates may also help. And experts advise getting enough sleep, avoiding caffeine and alcohol, and eating less fat, salt, and sugar.

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Excellent job. Period problems don't perplex you!

    Results:

    A solid score. Menstruation is no mystery to you.

    Results:

    You still have a few things to learn about menstruation. Period.

     

    Read up on menstruation and try the quiz again.

Sources | Reviewed by Nivin Todd, MD on May 23, 2016 Medically Reviewed on May 23, 2016

Reviewed by Nivin Todd, MD on
May 23, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Simon Battensby/Photographer's Choice RF

 

SOURCES:

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Menstruation in Girls and Adolescents -- Using the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign," "FAQ Especially for Teens: Menstruation," "FAQ: Gynecologic Problems, Premenstrual Syndrome."

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: "Menstrual Suppression," "Menstruation and Menstrual Suppression Survey."

Center for Young Women's Health, Children's Hospital Boston: "Medical Uses of the Birth Control Pill," "Menstrual Periods."

Chavez-MacGregor, M. Breast Cancer Research & Treatment , March 2008.

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: "Endometriosis."

Gollenberg, A. Journal of Women's Health, May 2010.

Halifax Health: "True or False: Women Who Live Together Tend to Have Synchronized Menstrual Periods."

National Health Service, United Kingdom: "Can I Get Pregnant Just After My Period Has Finished?" "Periods, heavy," "Vaginal Bleeding."

National Institutes of Health: "Prior Stress Could Worsen Premenstrual Symptoms, NIH Study Finds."

Nemours Center for Children's Health Media: "Expert Answers On … Is Period Blood Always Red?"

Penn Medicine: "Menstrual Periods -- Heavy, Prolonged, or Irregular."

Society for Menstrual Cycle Research: "Menstrual Synchrony: Do Girls Who Go Together Flow Together?"

University of Arizona Campus Health Service, SexTalk: "Is It Safe to Have Sex During Menstruation?"

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Vaginal Bleeding Between Periods -- Overview."

Office on Women's Health: "Menstruation and the Menstrual Cycle Fact Sheet," "Premenstrual Syndrome Fact Sheet," "Your Menstrual Cycle." 

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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