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ADHD in Children Health Center

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ADHD and Sleep Disorders

Does your child with ADHD sleep well, or do they toss and turn all night long?

Not every child with ADHD has sleep problems, but it can happen. In one study, about half the parents said their child with ADHD had difficulty sleeping. Parents reported that their child felt tired when they woke up, had nightmares, or had other sleep problems such as sleep apnea or restless legs syndrome . Another study involving children with ADHD found the children had less refreshing sleep, difficulty getting up, and more daytime sleepiness.

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Is snoring related to ADHD?

Large tonsils and adenoids can partially block the airway at night. This can cause snoring and poor sleep.

That, in turn, may lead to attention problems the next day. In one study of 5- to 7-year-olds, snoring was more common among children with mild ADHD than in the other children. In another study, kids who snored were almost twice as likely as their peers to have ADHD. However, that doesn't prove that snoring caused ADHD.

Children who snore tend to score worse on tests of attention, language abilities, and overall intelligence. Some studies have shown that taking out the tonsils and adenoids may result in better sleep and improved behavior without the need for medications.

Sleep Apnea

People with sleep apnea have brief episodes when they stop breathing, though they don't know it. These episodes can happen frequently throughout the night.

Enlarged tonsils and adenoids are the most common causes of sleep apnea in children. But obesity and chronic allergies can also be a cause.

As with adults, children with sleep apnea will be tired during the day. They may have problems concentrating and might have other symptoms related to lack of sleep. For instance, they may be irritable.

Sleep apnea in children is treatable. Your pediatrician or an ear, nose, and throat specialist can determine whether your child's tonsils are enlarged enough to possibly block the airway and cause sleep apnea.

To confirm the diagnosis, the child may get a sleep study that's done in a special laboratory. Not every child with enlarged tonsils or with loud snoring has sleep apnea.

Surgery is the treatment of choice for kids with enlarged tonsils and adenoids. Other treatments are available for those with restricted nighttime breathing due to allergies or other causes.

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