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Medicines That May Cause a Rash

People react to medicines in different ways. Some people have an allergic reaction and may break out in a rash. Here are some common medications that can cause rashes (this list is not all-inclusive):

Advil and Motrin (ibuprofen)

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Antibiotics -- penicillin, cephalosporins, or sulfonamides

Aquazide H, HydroDIURIL, and Microzide (hydrochlorothiazide)

Aspirin

Barbiturates and other anticonvulsants

Capoten (captopril)

Carbatrol, Tegretol (carbamazepine)

Chemotherapy drugs

Contrast dyes used in X-rays and MRIs

Dilantin, Phenytek (phenytoin)

Echinacea and other alternative and herbal medicines

Haldol (haloperidol)

Lamictal (lamotrigine)

Luminal, Solfoton(phenobarbital)

Mebaral (mephobarbital)

Monopril (fosinopril)

Pain medications that have codeine

Permitil and Prolixin (fluphenazine)

Prinivil and Zestril (lisinopril)

Thorazine or Ormazine (chlorpromazine)

Trilafon (perphenazine)

Vasotec (enalapril)

Zarontin (ethosuximide)

Zonegran (zonisamide)

If you get a rash after starting a new prescription medicine, call your doctor. You may want to take photos of the rash with a digital camera or cellphone and send it to your doctor. The rash may be a result of a medical problem -- not the drug you're taking. Or your doctor may tell you to stop taking the drug and prescribe a different one. If you get a rash from a non-prescription medicine, stop taking it immediately. Call your doctor if you need suggestions for a different medicine.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Luqman Seidu, MD on October 31, 2014

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