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    First Trimester of Pregnancy

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    What to Expect: Changes in Your Body continued...

    Mood swings. Increased fatigue and changing hormones can put you on an emotional roller coaster that makes you feel alternately elated and miserable, cranky and terrified. It's OK to cry, but if you're feeling overwhelmed, try to find an understanding ear -- if not from your partner, then from a friend or family member.

    Morning sickness. Nausea is one of the most universal pregnancy symptoms, affecting up to 85% of pregnant women. It's the result of hormone changes in the body, and it can last through the entire first trimester. For some pregnant women, nausea is mild; others can't start their day without vomiting. Nausea is usually worst in the morning (hence the name, "morning sickness"). To calm your nausea, try eating small, bland, or high-protein snacks (crackers, meat, or cheese) and sipping water, clear fruit juice (apple juice), or ginger ale. You may want to do even do this before getting out of bed. Avoid any foods that make you sick to your stomach. Nausea itself isn't anything to worry about, but if it persists or is severe, it can affect the amount of nutrition getting to your baby, so call your doctor if you can't stop vomiting or can't keep down any food.

    Weight gain. Pregnancy is one of the few times in a woman's life when weight gain is considered a good thing, but don't overdo it. During the first trimester, you should gain about 3 to 6 pounds (your doctor may recommend that you adjust your weight gain up or down if you started your pregnancy underweight or overweight). Although you're carrying an extra person, don't go by the adage of "eating for two." You only need about an extra 150 calories a day during your first trimester. Get those calories the healthy way, by adding extra fruits and vegetables, milk, whole-grain bread, and lean meat to your diet.

    Red Flag Symptoms

    Any of these symptoms could be a sign that something is seriously wrong with your pregnancy. Don't wait for your prenatal visit to talk about it. Call your doctor right away if you experience:

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson, MD on July 05, 2014
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