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Episiotomy and Perineal Tears - Overview

An episiotomy (say "eh-pih-zee-AH-tuh-mee") is a cut the doctor or midwife makes in the perineum (say "pair-uh-NEE-um"), which is the area between the vagina camera.gif and anus. It is done to help deliver the baby or to help prevent the muscles and skin from tearing.

The cut is made just before the baby's head comes out of the birth canal. It is stitched up after the birth.

When is an episiotomy needed?

There are times when an episiotomy is needed—for example, if the baby's heart rate drops too much during pushing or if the baby's position is causing problems. The decision cannot be made until delivery. Episiotomies are more common with first-time deliveries.

Routine episiotomy is not recommended. Experts say that episiotomy is usually not needed during most births.1

In the past, episiotomy was a very common part of childbirth. Many doctors no longer do episiotomies routinely. But a few still do. If you have a concern about this, talk to your doctor or midwife ahead of time.

Can you prevent perineal tears?

It's not uncommon for the perineum to tear during birth. But there are steps you can take to help prevent this:2

  • Pay attention to your position during labor. Different positions may put less pressure on your perineum. You may feel more comfortable sitting upright, lying on your side, or getting down on your hands and knees, for example.
  • Talk to your birthing coach ahead of time so you agree on when and how hard you should push.
  • Have someone provide perineal support. This means pushing against the perineum to protect it from tearing as the baby's head stretches it. This is sometimes done with a hot, moist cloth.
  • Practice perineal massage. This type of massage may help make the tissue around the vagina more flexible and reduce the chance of having a perineal tear or an episiotomy.2

Recovery from an episiotomy or perineal tear

If you had an incision (episiotomy) or a tear in the area between your vagina and anus (perineum) during delivery, your doctor or nurse-midwife will repair it with stitches, using a local anesthetic. An ice pack will be placed against your perineum to ease pain and swelling.

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