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    Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

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    Group II

    Group II is divided into groups IIA, IIB, and IIC.

    • IIA: Cancer was removed by surgery but cancer cells were seen when the tissue, taken from the edges of where the tumor was removed, was viewed under a microscope by a pathologist.
    • IIB: Cancer had spread to nearby lymph nodes and the cancer and lymph nodes were removed by surgery.
    • IIC: Cancer had spread to nearby lymph nodes and the cancer and lymph nodes were removed by surgery. Tissue was taken from the edges of where the tumor was removed. The tissue was checked under a microscope by a pathologist and cancer cells were seen.

    Group III

    Cancer was partly removed by biopsy or surgery but there is tumor remaining that can be seen with the eye. Cancer has not spread to distant parts of the body.

    Group IV

    Cancer had spread to distant parts of the body when the cancer was diagnosed.

    • Cancer cells are found by an imaging test; and
    • there are cancer cells in the fluid around the brain, spinal cord, or lungs, or in fluid in the abdomen; or tumors are found in those areas.

    The risk group is based on the staging system and the grouping system.

    The risk group describes the chance that rhabdomyosarcoma will recur (come back). Every child treated for rhabdomyosarcoma should receive chemotherapy to decrease the chance cancer will recur. The type of anticancer drug, dose, and the number of treatments given depends on whether the child has low-risk, intermediate-risk, or high-risk rhabdomyosarcoma. The following risk groups are used:

    Low-risk childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    Low-risk childhood rhabdomyosarcoma is one of the following:

    • An embryonal tumor of any size that is found in a "favorable" site. There may be tumor remaining after surgery that can be seen without a microscope. The cancer may have spread to nearby lymph nodes. The following areas are "favorable" sites:
      • Eye or area around the eye.
      • Head or neck (but not in the tissue next to the brain and spinal cord).
      • Gallbladder and bile ducts.
      • In the testes, vagina, or uterus.
    • An embryonal tumor of any size that is not found in one of the "favorable" sites listed above. There may be tumor remaining after surgery that can be seen only with a microscope. The cancer may have spread to nearby lymph nodes.
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