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    Macular Degeneration Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Macular Degeneration

    1. Eye Health and Vision Basics

      A primer of basic information about your eyes and vision.

    2. Vitamin E and Vision

      Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that some researchers think may help protect vision, but more research is needed.

    3. Adult Eye Exams

      Eye exams for adults can include many tests. Here's what to expect.

    4. Lutein and Zeaxanthin for Vision

      Lutein and zeaxathin in eye tissue are associated with better vision. WebMD explains how to boost these antioxidants in your diet to stave off cataracts and slow macular degeneration.

    5. Contact Lenses and Eye Infections

      When you wear contacts, you're more likely to get eye infections, including keratitis (corneal ulcers) and pinkeye (conjunctivitis).

    6. Detecting Eye Diseases and Conditions

      Learn more from WebMD about common eye diseases, such as cataracts, macular degeneration, glaucoma, and more.

    7. Your Vision in Adulthood and Middle Age

      Your eyesight changes as you age. Here's what you should know about vision in adulthood and middle age.

    8. A Visit to the Eye Doctor

      WebMD explains what a routine eye exam entails, including vision tests that may be performed.

    9. Eye and Vision Tests for Children and Teens - Topic Overview

      All children Use the guidelines below to schedule routine vision checks and eye exams with your pediatrician or family doctor. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Ophthalmologists (AAO) recommend that all children have an eye exam during the newborn period and again at all routine well-child visits.1The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening (tests) to detect lazy eye (amblyopia), misaligned eyes (strabismus), and defects in visual acuity in children between the ages of 3 and 5 years.2The AAP recommends that vision screening start around age 3 and occur each year at ages 4, 5, and 6. After that, screening should occur at ages 8, 10, 12, 15, and 18.3 The AAO recommends that vision screening start around age 3 and occur each year at ages 4 and 5. After age 5, the AAO recommends screening every 1 to 2 years.4Eye exams by a specialist (an ophthalmologist or optometrist) are recommended if a child of any age has: A family history

    10. Myths About Your Eyes and Vision

      Fact or fiction? Get the truths behind the myths about your eyes and vision.

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