Skip to content

    Heart Disease Health Center

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Keeping Track of Your Heart Medicines

    Treatment of heart disease usually requires a variety of heart medications. If you are tracking your heart medications, make sure to take the prescribed dose at the prescribed time, and get refills before they run out.

    If you are caring for a loved one with heart disease, you may need to remind him or her when it's time to take different drugs, or you may actually need to give out the medication when it's time to be taken.

    Recommended Related to Heart Disease

    Sex After a Heart Attack

    As a psychologist who has counseled heart patients for more than thirty years, Wayne Sotile, PhD, knows exactly how much they worry about sexafter a heart attack. "And if they're not anxious, believe me, their partner's anxious," he says. Couples worry about triggering a second heart attack, or even that a patient could die in the bedroom. But Sotile and cardiologists tell WebMD that sex isn't nearly as risky as many patients believe. With a touch of reassurance, heart patients can once again enjoy...

    Read the Sex After a Heart Attack article > >

    Following are pointers on tracking your heart medications and taking them safely.

    Daily Heart Medication Tips:

    • Know the names, dosages, and side effects of your heart medications and what they are used for.
    • Always keep a list of the medications with you so that ALL your doctors know exactly what you are taking.
    • Heart medications need to be taken as scheduled, at the same time every day. Medications should not be stopped or changed without first consulting with your doctor. Continue taking a heart drug even if you feel better; stopping medications suddenly can make your condition worse.
    • Develop a routine for taking your heart drugs. Get a pillbox that is marked with the days of the week, and fill the pillbox at the beginning of each week. This is an easy way to tell when each day's medications have been taken.
    • If a dose is missed, take it as soon as you remember to take it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, ask your doctor about skipping versus making up the missed dose. Two doses should never be taken to make up for the dose missed; nor should they be taken if you don't feel well.
    • Make sure prescriptions are filled regularly, and if you have questions, write them down and ask the pharmacist. Don't wait until you're completely out of medication before filling prescriptions.
    • Use one pharmacist to fill your prescriptions. That way, you can make sure you don't get medications that counteract each other.

    1 | 2 | 3

    Today on WebMD

    x-ray of human heart
    A visual guide.
    atrial fibrillation
    Symptoms and causes.
     
    heart rate graph
    10 things to never do.
    heart rate
    Get the facts.
     
    empty football helmet
    Article
    red wine
    Video
     
    eating blueberries
    Article
    Simple Steps to Lower Cholesterol
    Slideshow
     
    Inside A Heart Attack
    SLIDESHOW
    Omega 3 Sources
    SLIDESHOW
     
    Salt Shockers
    SLIDESHOW
    lowering blood pressure
    SLIDESHOW