Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Lung Disease & Respiratory Health Center

Font Size

Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia (Nosocomial Pneumonia) - Topic Overview

What is healthcare-associated pneumonia?

Healthcare-associated pneumonia (nosocomial pneumonia) is pneumonia that you get when you are in a hospital or nursing home. Experts generally consider it a more serious illness than pneumonia that people get in daily life (community-associated pneumonia). This is because the person with healthcare-associated pneumonia may already have a serious illness. Healthcare-associated pneumonia is also often caused by bacteria other than Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes most cases of pneumonia. These other bacteria may be stronger and more resistant to antibiotics than S. pneumoniae. So healthcare-associated pneumonia may be harder to treat.

You are more likely to get healthcare-associated pneumonia if you:

Recommended Related to Lung Disease/Respiratory Problems

Lung Diseases Overview

Lung diseases are some of the most common medical conditions in the world. Tens of millions of people suffer from lung disease in the U.S. Smoking, infections, and genetics are responsible for most lung diseases. The lungs are part of a complex apparatus, expanding and relaxing thousands of times each day to bring in oxygen and expel carbon dioxide. Lung disease can result from problems in any part of this system.

Read the Lung Diseases Overview article > >

What are the symptoms and how is it diagnosed?

Symptoms of healthcare-associated pneumonia include:

  • Fever.
  • Cough with mucus.
  • Changes in a lung exam or lab test.

It is important to diagnose the condition quickly. If your doctor thinks you have healthcare-associated pneumonia, you will have a chest X-ray. And your doctor will examine a sample of your mucus and blood.

How is healthcare-associated pneumonia treated?

Doctors use antibiotics to treat healthcare-associated pneumonia. Your doctor will probably give you an antibiotic that kills many different bacteria (wide-spectrum) immediately, before he or she can identify the type of bacteria causing the infection. After your doctor knows the specific type of bacteria, he or she may change your antibiotic to target it.

1

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: March 06, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia (Nosocomial Pneumonia) Topics

Today on WebMD

Living With Copd
VIDEO
Lung Disease Health Check
HEALTH CHECK
 
Cigarette butts in ashtray
Article
Household Hazards For People With Copd
Article
 

Bronchitis Overview
SLIDESHOW
Copd Myth Fact Quiz
QUIZ
 
Living With Copd
VIDEO
Energy Boosting Foods
SLIDESHOW
 

cigarette butts snuffed out in ashtray
SLIDESHOW
Healthy Home Health Check
TOOL
 
Senior woman stretching
Article
Diagnosing Copd
VIDEO
 

WebMD Special Sections