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    Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia (Nosocomial Pneumonia) - Topic Overview

    What is healthcare-associated pneumonia?

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (nosocomial pneumonia) is pneumonia that you get when you are in a hospital or nursing home. Experts generally consider it a more serious illness than pneumonia that people get in daily life (community-associated pneumonia). This is because the person with healthcare-associated pneumonia may already have a serious illness. Healthcare-associated pneumonia is also often caused by bacteria other than Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes most cases of pneumonia. These other bacteria may be stronger and more resistant to antibiotics than S. pneumoniae. So healthcare-associated pneumonia may be harder to treat.

    You are more likely to get healthcare-associated pneumonia if you:

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    Understanding Pneumonia -- Symptoms

    The symptoms of pneumoniacan include: Fever, with or without chills Muscle aches Fatigue Enlarged lymph nodes in the neck Chest pain Sore throat Coughing that usually brings up only a small amount of mucus Shortness of breath Rapid breathing You may also notice nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, heavy sweating, and mental confusion. Sometimes a person with diabetes may have only a few of the symptoms that you might see with a pneumonia...

    Read the Understanding Pneumonia -- Symptoms article > >

    What are the symptoms and how is it diagnosed?

    Symptoms of healthcare-associated pneumonia include:

    It is important to diagnose the condition quickly. If your doctor thinks you have healthcare-associated pneumonia, you will have a chest X-ray. And your doctor will examine a sample of your mucus and blood.

    How is healthcare-associated pneumonia treated?

    Doctors use antibiotics to treat healthcare-associated pneumonia. Your doctor will probably give you an antibiotic that kills many different bacteria (wide-spectrum) immediately, before he or she can identify the type of bacteria causing the infection. After your doctor knows the specific type of bacteria, he or she may change your antibiotic to target it.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: September 09, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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