Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

Font Size

Melanoma Detection: Waiting Is Risky for Men

Have a Doctor Check Out Suspicious Moles While They Are Small, Easier to Treat

Risky Wait for Melanoma Detection

In the second study, researcher Alan C. Geller, MPH, RN, of the Harvard School of Public Health, and colleagues used the same survey data to examine factors related to melanoma detection by doctors.

They found that men whose melanomas were detected by a doctor tended to be older (57% were 65 or older compared with 42% of those who detected the cancer themselves and 34% whose melanoma was detected by someone else).

Researchers say this may be because older men tend to visit their doctor more frequently than younger men. They may also have poorer eyesight for self-detection and are less likely to have a partner to look at their skin.

Melanoma detection by a doctor proved to be the best method of detecting melanomas in their early, thin stages. Ninety-two percent of doctor-detected melanomas on the back were less than 2 millimeters thick compared with 76% of those detected by other people and 63% of self-detected melanomas.

1|2

Today on WebMD

Woman checking out tan lines
SLIDESHOW
Cancer Fighting Foods Slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 
what is your cancer risk
HEALTH CHECK
Could Caffeine Help Fight Skin Cancer
VIDEO
 

12 Ways to Protect Your Skin from Melanoma
ARTICLE
precancerous lesions slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 
Do You Know Your Melanoma ABCs
VIDEO
15 Cancer Symptoms Men Ignore
ARTICLE
 

screening tests for men
SLIDESHOW
Vitamin D
SLIDESHOW
 
Is That Mole Skin Cancer
VIDEO
Brilliant sun rays
Quiz
 

WebMD Special Sections