Skip to content

Given all the chewing, crunching, biting, and gnashing they do, our teeth are surprisingly resilient. Still, everyday wear and tear and the natural aging process take a toll.

Here’s what happens to teeth as we age -- and what you can do to keep your teeth strong and sparkling for a lifetime.

Preventing Acid Erosion

By far the biggest threat to teeth is sugary and starchy food. These carbohydrates ferment, causing the bacteria in the mouth to produce acids. Those acids can quickly eat away at the enamel of teeth.  As a result, this creates tiny pits where tooth decay can form.

Most of us assume that sugary candy is the worst offender. But sweetened carbonated beverages, such as colas, can be even more dangerous, since carbonation increases acid levels in the mouth. Some recent studies have singled out sports drinks as a particular threat to tooth enamel. 

What to do:

  • Go easy on sugary foods, especially carbonated soft drinks and sports drinks.
  • Avoid frequent snacking, which causes acid levels in the mouth to remain high over an extended time.
  • If you get a craving for something sweet, chew sugarless gum. Chewing increases saliva production, which helps cleanse the mouth and neutralize acidity.
  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day for two minutes and floss daily. Daily dental hygiene reduces bacteria levels in your mouth.
  • See your dentist every six months for a regular checkup that includes removing plaque buildup.

Preventing Mechanical Wear and Tear on Your Teeth

The function of teeth is mostly mechanical -- to mash and grind and otherwise break up food to make it more easily digested. For the most part, our teeth are resistant to cracks and chips.

“Contrary to what many people assume, teeth do not become more brittle with age,” says Steven E. Schonfeld, a private practice dentist and spokesperson for the American Dental Association. “Still, we see patients all the time who have cracked or chipped a tooth biting down hard on something like an olive that still has a pit or a kernel of unpopped popcorn.”

Teeth that have fillings or root canals are particularly vulnerable, since they don’t have the strength of structurally intact teeth.

Tips for Pretty Teeth and Gums

See how to keep your teeth healthy, white, and even.
View slideshow