Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Font Size

Spring Forward With 10 Sleep Tips

When we spring forward to daylight saving time, we lose an hour of sleep. Most of us feel the effect for a few days afterward.

Use these 10 sleep tips to help you spring forward easily and sleep better all year long.

1. Gradually Transition Into the Time Change

To minimize the impact of the switch to daylight saving time, make gradual adjustments. Go to bed and put your children to bed 15 minutes early, starting several days before the change. Make an extra effort to be well-rested the week before the time change.

2. Give Yourself a Sleep Break After the Time Change

If you feel sleepy after the change to daylight saving time, take a short nap in the afternoon -- not too close to bedtime. Avoid sleeping in an hour longer in the mornings. Your internal clock will adjust on its own in several days.

3. Know How Much Sleep You Need

Not everyone needs the same amount of sleep to be well-rested, and sleep requirements can change with age. To find your ideal number of hours, sleep without an alarm on weekends and see when you wake up naturally.

4. Keep Regular Sleep Hours

Go to bed and wake up at the same time each day. This helps your body regulate its sleep pattern and get the most out of the hours you sleep. If possible, wake up at the same time on the weekends, too, which makes Monday mornings easier to bear. You can also see how a nap affects your sleep quality. For some, napping can make nighttime sleeping harder; but for others, a short nap (20 minutes) can be revitalizing, without ruining their night's sleep.

5. Get Some Exercise During the Day

Even moderate exercise, such as walking, can help you sleep better. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise, three times a week or more. If you often don't sleep well, try not to exercise too close to bedtime.

6. Avoid Stimulating Substances

Alcohol and caffeine (found in coffee, tea, chocolate, and some pain relievers) can interfere with sleep. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid alcohol and caffeine for 4 to 6 hours before bedtime. Smokers should also avoid tobacco, another stimulant, too close to bedtime.

Today on WebMD

fatigued senior woman
We’ve got 10 tips to show you how
Man snoring in bed
Know your myths from your facts.
Young woman sleeping
What do your dreams say about you?
woman eith hangover
It’s common, and really misunderstood.
Young woman sleeping
Cannot sleep
child sitting in bed
Woman with insomnia
nurse sleeping
Foods That Help Or Harm Your Sleep
Insomnia 20 Tips For Better Sleep
Pain at Night