Skip to content

Smoking Cessation Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Stop Smoking by Writing

How I wrote my way out of smoking -- online.
By
WebMD Feature

Mim Drew, a 37-year-old actress and new mom who lives in Studio City, Calif., started smoking when she was about 15. She was 31 -- smoking about a pack and a half a day -- when she decided to stop smoking. Here's how she used writing as a tool to quit smoking, and how you can, too.

Recommended Related to Smoking Cessation

Quitting Time: How to Stop Smoking for Good

Congratulations! You've decided to quit smoking. But how? The answer depends on why you smoke. "Men smoke more for the effect of the nicotine. Women smoke more to regulate mood and stress," says Kelly P. Cosgrove, PhD. She's an associate professor of psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine. So, a good quitting strategy for women includes more than nicotine replacement. That's because the female brain responds to nicotine differently than the male brain. Nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT) -- patches,...

Read the Quitting Time: How to Stop Smoking for Good article > >

When I hit my 30s, I knew I had to stop smoking. But boy, did I love it! When I met my now-husband, he was doing a public service announcement for the American Lung Association, and I was feeling very guilty about being his smoking girlfriend as he was shooting these things. He said, "I think I want to spend the rest of my life with you, but I don't think I can do that with a smoker." So I tried the ALA's Freedom from Smoking Program online.

One of the best parts of this program was its online component. As I completed each step, I could go to an online forum and write about how I was doing and see how others were doing. What appealed to me was that at 2 p.m., when I was going nuts for a cigarette, I could go online and write about my feelings and someone else would respond. It was a very neat, anonymous way to put my feelings out there and admit how helpless I was in the face of this addiction, how much it had a grip on me. I quit a lot of times before, but it never stuck. This time it did.

Why Writing Can Help You Quit Smoking

Writing about what you're feeling when you stop smoking can be an important tool to help you quit. Many smoking cessation programs offer workbooks, diaries, and other tools to help you write about your experiences, whether in a journal, on a simple piece of paper, or online.

"In one of our booklets, we have a 'tobacco tracker," says Trina Ita, counseling supervisor for the American Cancer Society's Quitline. "People can use it to journal about when they had their last cigarette, what their mood was, and what they were doing. It can be very helpful in identifying your patterns related to smoking. You'll see, 'Oh, it was around the middle of the day, 20 minutes after lunch when I was on my way to a meeting, that's when I had my worst craving.' Then you can plan what to do during that time to get through it."

Today on WebMD

hands breaking a cigarette
Is quitting cold turkey an effective method?
ashtray
14 tips to get you through the first hard days.
 
smoking man
Surprising impacts of tobacco on the body.
cigarette smoke
What happens when you kick the habit?
 

Filtered cigarettes
ARTICLE
an array of e cigarettes
ARTICLE
 
human heart
ARTICLE
Woman experiencing withdrawal symptoms
ARTICLE
 

man smoking cigarette
ARTICLE
no smoking sign
VIDEO
 
Woman ashing cigarette in ashtray
ARTICLE
chain watch
ARTICLE