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    Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine for Adults

    Chickenpox is a common illness caused by the varicella-zoster virus. Symptoms of chickenpox include fever and itchy spots or blisters all over the body. Chickenpox is usually mild and runs its course in five to 10 days, but it can cause more serious problems when teens and adults get it. People with weakened immune systems are especially susceptible to developing serious complications from chickenpox.

    Some complications that can arise from chickenpox include:

    Did You Know?

    Under the Affordable Care Act, many health insurance plans will cover preventive care services, including checkups, vaccinations and screening tests, at no cost to you. Learn more.

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    Vaccination is the best way to prevent chickenpox. A chickenpox vaccine has been available in the U.S. since 1995 and is easy to get from a doctor or a public health clinic. The chickenpox vaccine is very effective at preventing the disease -- between 70% and 90% of people who get vaccinated will be completely immune to chickenpox. If a vaccinated person does get chickenpox, the symptoms will be very mild and only last for a few days.

    When should adults be vaccinated against chickenpox?

    All adults who have never had chickenpox or received the vaccination should be vaccinated against it. Two doses of the vaccine should be given at least four weeks apart.

    If you've never had chickenpox or been vaccinated and you are exposed to chickenpox, being vaccinated right away will greatly reduce your risk of getting sick. Studies have shown that vaccination within three days of exposure is 90% effective at preventing illness; vaccination within five days of exposure is 70% effective. If you do get sick, the symptoms will be milder and shorter in duration.

    Who shouldn’t get the chickenpox vaccine?

    You should not be vaccinated against chickenpox if you:

    • Are moderately to severely ill at the time of vaccination
    • Are pregnant (women should not become pregnant for one month after receiving the chickenpox vaccine)
    • Have ever had an allergic reaction to gelatin, the antibiotic neomycin, or a previous dose of chickenpox vaccine

    These people should check with their doctor about getting the chickenpox vaccine:

    • Patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiation for cancer
    • People taking steroid drugs
    • People with HIV or another disease that compromises the immune system
    • Patients who recently had a blood transfusion or received other blood products

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