Skip to content

Find a Vitamin or Supplement

MOLYBDENUM

Other Names:

Ammonium Molybdate, Chélate de Molybdate, Chelated Molybdenum, Citrate de Molybdène, Etrathiomolybdate, Ionic Molybdenum, Mo, Molibdeno, Molybdate d’Ammonium, Molybdate de Sodium, Molybdene, Molybdène, Molybdenum Citrate, Molybdenum Picolinate, ...
See All Names

MOLYBDENUM Overview
MOLYBDENUM Uses
MOLYBDENUM Side Effects
MOLYBDENUM Interactions
MOLYBDENUM Dosing
MOLYBDENUM Overview Information

Molybdenum is a trace mineral found in foods such as milk, cheese, cereal grains, legumes, nuts, leafy vegetables, and organ meats. The amount in plant-derived foods depends on the soil content in the growing area. Molybdenum is also present in water in varying amounts. Molybdenum is stored in the body, particularly in the liver, kidneys, glands, and bones. It is also found in the lungs, spleen, skin, and muscles. About 90% of the molybdenum eaten in foods is eliminated by the body through the urine.

How does it work?

Molybdenum works in the body to break down proteins and other substances. Molybdenum deficiency is very uncommon.

Molybdenum has an important role in normal body functions, but there is not enough information to know how it might work for any medical condition.

MOLYBDENUM Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Likely Effective for:

  • Molybdenum deficiency. Taking molybdenum can prevent deficiency. However, it is very uncommon to have molybdenum deficiency.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Esophageal cancer. Having low amounts of molybdenum in the body might be linked with an increased risk of esophageal cancer. However, it’s not known if taking molybdenum supplements reduces the risk of esophageal cancer.
  • Liver disease.
  • HIV/AIDS.
  • Yeast infections.
  • Lyme disease.
  • Sulfite sensitivity.
  • Chemical sensitivity.
  • Allergies.
  • Asthma.
  • Acne.
  • Anemia.
  • Gout.
  • Cancer.
  • Insomnia.
  • Eczema.
  • Bell’s palsy.
  • Multiple sclerosis.
  • Lupus.
  • Wilson's disease.
  • Weak bones (osteoporosis).
  • Cavities.
  • Improving libido.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of molybdenum for these uses.


MOLYBDENUM Side Effects & Safety

Molybdenum is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately by adults. Molybdenum is safe in amounts that do not exceed 2 mg per day, the Tolerable Upper Intake Level.

However, molybdenum is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in high doses. Adults should avoid exceeding 2 mg daily.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Molybdenum is LIKELY SAFE in amounts that do not exceed the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of 1.7 mg per day for women 14 to 18 years, or 2 mg per day for women 19 and older. It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used in high doses. Avoid exceeding 1.7 mg per day for women 14 to 18 years, or 2 mg per day for women 19 and older.

Children: For children, molybdenum is LIKELY SAFE in amounts that do not exceed the UL of 0.3 mg per day for children 1 to 3 years, 0.6 mg per day for children 4 to 8 years, 1.1 mg per day for children 9 to 13 years, and 1.7 mg per day for adolescents. However, molybdenum is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in high doses. Children should avoid exceeding 0.3 mg per day for children 1 to 3 years, 0.6 mg per day for children 4 to 8 years, 1.1 mg per day for children 9 to 13 years, and 1.7 mg per day for adolescents.

Gout: Very high levels of molybdenum in the diet such as 10 to 15 mg/day, and industrial exposure to molybdenum, might cause gout. Molybdenum supplements might make gout worse. Avoid taking molybdenum in doses above 2 mg per day for adults.

MOLYBDENUM Interactions What is this?

We currently have no information for MOLYBDENUM Interactions

MOLYBDENUM Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • The National Institute of Medicine has determined Adequate Intake (AI) of molybdenum for infants: 0 to 6 months, 2 mcg/day; 7 to 12 months, 3 mcg/day.
  • For children, a Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) has been set: 1 to 3 years, 17 mcg/day; 4 to 8 years, 22 mcg/day; 9 to 13 years, 34 mcg/day; 14 to 18 years, 43 mcg/day. For men and women age 19 years and older, the RDA is 45 mcg/day. For pregnancy and lactation, the RDA is 50 mcg/day for women of all ages. It is estimated that a typical US adult’s diet supplies 120 mcg/day to 210 mcg/day.

See 3 Reviews for this Treatment - OR -

Review this Treatment

Learn about User Reviews and read IMPORTANT information about user generated content

Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

Search for a Vitamin or Supplement

Ex. Ginseng, Vitamin C, Depression

Today on WebMD

Woman taking a vitamin or supplement
Article
Man taking a vitamin or supplement
Article
 
clams
Quiz
Woman in sun
Slideshow
 
Flaxseed added fiber
Video
!!69X75_Vitamins_Supplements.jpg
Evaluator
 
Woman sleeping
Article
Woman staring into space with coffee
Article
 
IMPORTANT: About This Section and Other User-Generated Content on WebMD

The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, or blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatment or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service, or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD User-generated content as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.