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RIBOSE

Other Names:

Beta-D-ribofuranose, D-ribosa, D-ribose, Ribosa.

RIBOSE Overview
RIBOSE Uses
RIBOSE Side Effects
RIBOSE Interactions
RIBOSE Dosing
RIBOSE Overview Information

Ribose is a kind of sugar that is produced by the body. It is used as a medicine.

Ribose is used to improve athletic performance and the ability to exercise by boosting muscle energy. It has also been used to improve symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), fibromyalgia, and coronary artery disease. Ribose has been used to prevent symptoms such as cramping, pain, and stiffness after exercise in people with an inherited disorder called myoadenylate deaminase deficiency (MAD) or AMP deaminase deficiency (AMPD deficiency). Ribose has also been used to improve exercise ability in people with another inherited disorder called McArdle's disease.

Healthcare providers sometimes give ribose intravenously (by IV) as part of an imaging procedure used to measure the extent of damaged heart muscle in people with coronary artery disease. Ribose has also been used intravenously in patients with MAD to prevent symptoms such as cramping, pain, and stiffness.

How does it work?

Ribose is an energy source that the body makes from food. There is some evidence that supplemental ribose might prevent muscle fatigue in people with genetic disorders that prevent sufficient energy production by the body. It might provide extra energy to the heart during exercise in people with heart disease.

RIBOSE Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Clogged heart arteries (coronary artery disease). Taking ribose by mouth seems to be effective for improving the heart's ability to manage low blood flow in people with coronary artery disease.
  • Myoadenylate deaminase deficiency (MAD). Taking ribose by mouth or intravenously seems to be effective for preventing symptoms such as cramping, pain, and stiffness after exercise in people with MAD, also known as AMP deaminase deficiency (AMPD deficiency).

Possibly Ineffective for:

  • Athletic performance. Research suggests that taking ribose supplements by mouth, alone or with other supplements, does not increase power or improve muscle strength in trained or untrained individuals.

Likely Ineffective for:

  • McArdle's disease (a genetic metabolic disorder). Research shows that taking ribose by mouth does not improve exercise ability in people with McArdle's disease.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Early research suggests that taking a ribose supplement (CORvalen, Valen Labs) by mouth might improve energy, sleep, and sense of well-being in people with chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • Mental function. Early research suggests that taking ribose by mouth for 8 days does not improve performance during tasks that cause mental fatigue.
  • Congestive heart failure (CHF). Early research suggests that people with congestive heart failure who take a ribose by mouth for 3 weeks have better heart function and improved quality of life.
  • Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Early research shows that people who take a ribose supplement by mouth immediately before surgery have better heart function after surgery.
  • Fibromyalgia. Early research suggests that taking a specific ribose supplement (CORvalen, Valen Labs) by mouth can improve energy, sleep, and sense of well-being and decrease pain in people with fibromyalgia.
  • Restless leg syndrome. Limited evidence suggests that taking ribose by mouth with meals improves symptoms in people with restless leg syndrome.
  • Seizures. Early research suggests that taking ribose by mouth might improve behavior and reduce seizure frequency in people with seizures caused by a deficiency of the chemical adenylosuccinase.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of ribose for these uses.


RIBOSE Side Effects & Safety

Ribose seems to be LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth for short-term use or when given intravenously (by IV) by a healthcare provider. It can cause some side effects including diarrhea, stomach discomfort, nausea, headache, and low blood sugar.

There isn’t enough information about the safety of long-term use.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking ribose if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: Ribose might lower blood sugar. When used along with diabetes medications that lower blood sugar, it might make blood sugar drop too low. It’s best not to use ribose if you have diabetes.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia): Ribose might lower blood sugar. If you already have blood sugar that is too low, don’t take ribose.

Surgery: Since ribose might lower blood sugar, there is a concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking ribose at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

RIBOSE Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Insulin interacts with RIBOSE

    Ribose might decrease blood sugar. Insulin is also used to decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with insulin might cause your blood sugar to be too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your insulin might need to be changed.

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with RIBOSE

    Ribose might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking ribose along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

    Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.


Minor Interaction Be watchful with this combination

  • Alcohol interacts with RIBOSE

    Alcohol might decrease your blood sugar. Ribose might also decrease your blood sugar. Taking ribose along with alcohol might cause your blood sugar to go too low.

  • Aspirin interacts with RIBOSE

    Ribose might decrease blood sugar. Large amounts of aspirin might also decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with large amounts of aspirin might cause your blood sugar to go too low. But this interaction probably isn't a big concern for most people that take 81 mg of aspirin a day.

  • Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate (Trilisate) interacts with RIBOSE

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate) might decrease your blood sugar. Ribose might also decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate) might cause your blood sugar to be too low. But it is not clear if this interaction is a big concern.

  • Propranolol (Inderal) interacts with RIBOSE

    Propanolol (Inderal) might decrease blood sugar. Ribose might also decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with propanolol (Inderal) might cause your blood sugar to go too low.

  • Salsalate (Disalcid) interacts with RIBOSE

    Large amounts of salsalate (Disalcid) can cause blood sugar to become low. Taking salsalate along with ribose might cause blood sugar to become too low.


RIBOSE Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • To improve the ability of people with coronary artery disease to exercise: 15 grams four times daily. Beginning 1 hour before exercise until the end of the exercise session, 3 grams every 10 minutes has been used to reduce muscle stiffness and cramps caused by exercising.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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