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Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - Surgery

Surgery isn't usually done to treat pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) unless it is needed to:

  • Drain or remove a pocket of pus, such as a tubo-ovarian abscess.
  • Cut scar tissue that is causing pain. This hasn't been shown to relieve pain when the scarring is severe.2

Surgery—usually laparoscopy— is sometimes used when a diagnosis is still unclear after other tests are done or when antibiotic treatment is not working.

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Surgery choices

Procedures that may be used to diagnose and treat the complications of PID include:

  • Laparoscopy. The surgeon inserts a lighted viewing instrument through a very small cut (incision). He or she can look for signs of ectopic pregnancy or infection and scar tissue and can make repairs if needed.
  • Laparotomy. The surgeon makes a small cut to look inside the belly and make repairs if needed.
  • Drainage of an abscess using a needle and syringe. The doctor usually uses ultrasound to clearly see where the needle is going. This makes an incision unnecessary.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: March 12, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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