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What drugs are used to treat inflammatory diseases?

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  • There are many drugs available to decrease joint pain, swelling and inflammation, and possibly prevent or minimize the progression of the inflammatory disease. They are often used in combination because of their differing effects. The medications include: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen)
  • Corticosteroids (such as prednisone)
  • Antimalarial medications (such as hydroxychloroquine)
  • Other oral drugs known as DMARDs (disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs), including methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide
  • Biologic drugs such as infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumab, golimumab, abatacept, tocilizumab, and rituximab

From: What Is Inflammation? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 9/13/2018

SOURCES:

MedlinePlus: "Arthritis."

American College of Rheumatology: "Arthritis in Children."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskelatal and Skin Diseases: "Arthritis."

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

SOURCES:

MedlinePlus: "Arthritis."

American College of Rheumatology: "Arthritis in Children."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskelatal and Skin Diseases: "Arthritis."

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

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How are medications for inflammatory diseases used?

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