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How can emotions cause back pain?

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Don’t underestimate the power of feelings to bring on pain. Stress can lead to muscle tension in the back, and depression and anxiety may make the pain feel even worse.

From: Causes of Back Pain WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pain Medicine web site: “Commonly-Reported Pain Conditions.”

Chien JJ. Curr Pain Headache Rep. Dec 2008.

Arthritis Foundation: “Degenerative Disc Disease;” “Understanding Arthritis;” and “What is Ankylosing Spondylitis?”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Fast Facts About Back Pain;" “Low Back Pain Fact Sheet;” and “What is Spinal Stenosis?”

UCLA Spine Center: “Sacroiliac Joint Disease” and “What You Should Know About Radiculopathy.”

Spine Universe: “Common and Uncommon Causes of Back Pain.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Lumbar Spinal Stenosis;” “Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine;” and “Sciatica.”

UpToDate: “Patient information: Low back pain in adults (Beyond the Basics).”

Cedars-Sinai web site: “Back Spasm.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “Recommendations for Keeping One’s Back Healthy.”

Mayoclinic.org: “Sacroiliitis.”

Rheumatology.org: “Osteoarthritis.”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on January 29, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pain Medicine web site: “Commonly-Reported Pain Conditions.”

Chien JJ. Curr Pain Headache Rep. Dec 2008.

Arthritis Foundation: “Degenerative Disc Disease;” “Understanding Arthritis;” and “What is Ankylosing Spondylitis?”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Fast Facts About Back Pain;" “Low Back Pain Fact Sheet;” and “What is Spinal Stenosis?”

UCLA Spine Center: “Sacroiliac Joint Disease” and “What You Should Know About Radiculopathy.”

Spine Universe: “Common and Uncommon Causes of Back Pain.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Lumbar Spinal Stenosis;” “Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine;” and “Sciatica.”

UpToDate: “Patient information: Low back pain in adults (Beyond the Basics).”

Cedars-Sinai web site: “Back Spasm.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “Recommendations for Keeping One’s Back Healthy.”

Mayoclinic.org: “Sacroiliitis.”

Rheumatology.org: “Osteoarthritis.”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on January 29, 2018

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Does physical therapy help lower back pain?

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