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  • Question 1/10

    You can snuggle your way to a better mood.

  • Answer 1/10

    You can snuggle your way to a better mood.

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    • Correct Answer:

    When you cuddle, cozy up, or snag a good hug, your brain releases something called oxytocin. Known as the “love” and “cuddle” hormone, it can lower stress and make you feel closer to someone. No one around to hug? You can get a big mood boost by petting your dog or cat, too. 

  • Question 1/10

    Your brain changes when you hear a good joke.

  • Answer 1/10

    Your brain changes when you hear a good joke.

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    When you laugh, chemicals called endorphins flow through your brain. They not only lift your spirits, but they also help your body ward off illness and ease pain. So go ahead: Giggle your way to better health.

  • Question 1/10

    This can help get you out of a funk:   

  • Answer 1/10

    This can help get you out of a funk:   

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    Heard of runner’s high? People are happier and have more energy after pounding the pavement. You don’t need to log miles to get in better spirits, though. Any kind of regular exercise will help. When you run, swim, bike, or walk quickly, your brain releases endorphins, one of your body’s own happy drugs.  

  • Question 1/10

    Social media triggers a hormone high. 

  • Answer 1/10

    Social media triggers a hormone high. 

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    • Correct Answer:

    It gives you a rush like a good workout or a long hug because it releases dopamine, your body’s “reward” hormone. That’s because the love you feel from social media affects the reward centers of your brain. Likes, shares, and retweets make us feel good -- and make us want to keep sharing. That helps explain why we spend too much time on our phones.

  • Question 1/10

    Bananas can boost your mood.

  • Answer 1/10

    Bananas can boost your mood.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Bananas do have one of those uplifting hormones: serotonin. (It’s commonly used in medications to treat depression.) But when it’s in food, it can’t get into your brain and won’t affect your mood. You might feel better about yourself for choosing a healthy snack, though! 

  • Question 1/10

    A massage can help with depression.

  • Answer 1/10

    A massage can help with depression.

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    • Correct Answer:

    It leads to less tension and stress. Why? During a massage, your body makes more serotonin and dopamine and less of the stress hormone cortisol. That combo may help with depression, lessen your pain, and help you sleep. 

  • Question 1/10

    Chocolate can make you happy.

  • Answer 1/10

    Chocolate can make you happy.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Here’s the sweet truth about this favored treat: Chocolate not only tastes good, but it also can give your mood a boost. This may be because dark chocolate ups your endorphin levels. Limit yourself to two small squares of dark chocolate a day, though. Extra weight could be a buzzkill.

  • Question 1/10

    Why are cocaine and most other illegal drugs so hard to quit? 

  • Answer 1/10

    Why are cocaine and most other illegal drugs so hard to quit? 

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your brain is wired to remember things that feel good. When you eat or have sex, your body releases dopamine in the areas that control pleasure, movement, and emotions. Some drugs release up to 10 times the amount of dopamine that eating and sex do.

  • Question 1/10

    Oxytocin is sometimes given to: 

  • Answer 1/10

    Oxytocin is sometimes given to: 

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    • Correct Answer:

    During childbirth, this can be given to a woman to move contractions along. But it should be used carefully because it can make them too strong and come too close together.

  • Question 1/10

    Medication with dopamine can help people with this disease:

  • Answer 1/10

    Medication with dopamine can help people with this disease:

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    People with this disorder, which affects your nervous system, don’t make enough dopamine. That’s why it’s hard for them to control their movements and emotions.  

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    C’mon, get happy! You’re a feel-good hormone hotshot!

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Sources | Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson, MD on January 31, 2019 Medically Reviewed on January 31, 2019

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson, MD on
January 31, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) milanvirijevic / Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

 

American Marketing Association: “Social Media Triggers a Dopamine High.”

American Pregnancy Association: “Inducing Labor.”

British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology: “The neuroprotective effects of cocoa flavanol and its influence on cognitive performance.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Daily Wellness Tip: Giggle Your Way to a Good Mood and a Pain-Free Back,” “Good Carbs: This is Your Brain on  Carbs,” “Eating Chocolate Can Be Healthy,” “Healthy Sex=Happy Life,” “What a Rush!” “Your Body, Your Stress.”

Harvard Medical School: “Exercising to Relax.”

Hormone Health Network: “Hormonal Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate.”

National Alliance on Mental Illness: “Depression.”

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “Drugs and the Brain.”

National Parkinson Foundation: “What is Parkinson’s?”

Nutrients: “Influence of Tryptophan and Serotonin on Mood and Cognition With a Possible Role of the Gut-Brain Axis.”

Parkinson’s Disease Foundation: “Prescription Medications.”

Science Museum: “What Are Endorphins?”

UCLA: “The Teenage Brain on Social Media.”

Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience, November 2007.

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