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What follow-up will you need if you've had a tubular adenoma?

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If you’ve had tubular or any other types of adenomas, you’ll need to have a follow-up colonoscopy to make sure they don’t return. Usually, you’ll need a repeat procedure every 3-5 years. But you may need one sooner if you had a lot of polyps, if they were big, or if your doctor was not able to remove them all.

From: What Is Tubular Adenoma? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Colon Polyps,” “Familial adenomatous polyposis,” “Inflammatory Bowel Disease.”

Colon Cancer Alliance: “Frequently Asked Questions.”

University of Utah: “Colon, adenomatous polyp (tubular adenoma).”

American Cancer Society: “Understanding Your Pathology Report: Colon Polyps.”

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: “Understanding Colonoscopy.”

UpToDate: “Patient education: Colon polyps (Beyond the Basics).”

National Institutes of Health: “What is a gene mutation and how do mutations occur?”


Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Colorectal Cancer: From Polyp to Cancer.”

American Family Physician : “Update on Colorectal Cancer.”

CDC: “What Can I Do to Reduce My Risk of Colorectal Cancer?”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 04, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Colon Polyps,” “Familial adenomatous polyposis,” “Inflammatory Bowel Disease.”

Colon Cancer Alliance: “Frequently Asked Questions.”

University of Utah: “Colon, adenomatous polyp (tubular adenoma).”

American Cancer Society: “Understanding Your Pathology Report: Colon Polyps.”

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: “Understanding Colonoscopy.”

UpToDate: “Patient education: Colon polyps (Beyond the Basics).”

National Institutes of Health: “What is a gene mutation and how do mutations occur?”


Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Colorectal Cancer: From Polyp to Cancer.”

American Family Physician : “Update on Colorectal Cancer.”

CDC: “What Can I Do to Reduce My Risk of Colorectal Cancer?”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 04, 2017

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Do colon polyps raise your risk of colon cancer?

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