Warnings:

Morphine has a risk for abuse and addiction, which can lead to overdose and death. Morphine may also cause severe, possibly fatal, breathing problems. To lower your risk, your doctor should have you use the smallest dose of morphine that works, and use it for the shortest possible time. See also How to Use section for more information about addiction.

The risk for severe breathing problems is higher when you start this medication and after a dose increase, or if you use the wrong dose/strength. Using this medication with alcohol or other drugs that can cause drowsiness or breathing problems may cause very serious side effects, including death. Be sure you know how to use morphine and what other drugs you should avoid taking with it. See also Drug Interactions section. Get medical help right away if any of these very serious side effects occur: slow/shallow breathing, unusual lightheadedness, severe drowsiness/dizziness, difficulty waking up.

Keep this medicine in a safe place to prevent theft, misuse, or abuse. If someone accidentally swallows or uses this drug, get medical help right away.

Before using this medication, women of childbearing age should talk with their doctor(s) about the risks and benefits. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or if you plan to become pregnant. During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. It may slightly increase the risk of birth defects if used during the first two months of pregnancy. Also, using it for a long time or in high doses near the expected delivery date may harm the unborn baby. To lessen the risk, use the smallest effective dose for the shortest possible time. Babies born to mothers who use this drug for a long time may develop severe (possibly fatal) withdrawal symptoms. Tell the doctor right away if you notice any symptoms in your newborn baby such as crying that doesn't stop, slow/shallow breathing, irritability, shaking, vomiting, diarrhea, poor feeding, or difficulty gaining weight.

Uses

This medication is used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. It acts on certain centers in the brain to give you pain relief. This medication is an opioid analgesic.

How to use Morphine SULFATE Suppository, Rectal

Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start using morphine and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Unwrap and insert one suppository rectally as directed by your doctor. Lie down on your left side with right knee bent. Gently push the suppository into the rectum with your finger. Remain lying down for a few minutes, and avoid having a bowel movement for an hour or longer so the drug will be absorbed. The suppository is for rectal use only.

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy. Pain medications work best if they are used as the first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the pain has worsened, the medication may not work as well.

You may also take long-acting opioid medications or use opioid patches for ongoing pain if so directed by your doctor. In that case, this medication might be used for sudden (breakthrough) pain only as needed. Also follow your doctor's or pharmacist's instructions for safely using other pain relievers (such as naproxen, ibuprofen). Ask your doctor or pharmacist about using morphine safely with other drugs.

Suddenly stopping this medication may cause withdrawal, especially if you have used it for a long time or in high doses. To prevent withdrawal, your doctor may lower your dose slowly. Tell your doctor or pharmacist right away if you have any withdrawal symptoms such as restlessness, mental/mood changes (including anxiety, trouble sleeping, thoughts of suicide), watering eyes, runny nose, nausea, diarrhea, sweating, muscle aches, or sudden changes in behavior.

Though it helps many people, this medication may sometimes cause addiction. This risk may be higher if you have a substance use disorder (such as overuse of or addiction to drugs/alcohol). Use this medication exactly as prescribed to lower the risk of addiction. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

When used for an extended period, this medication may not work as well and may require different dosing. Talk with your doctor if this medication stops working well.

Tell your doctor if your pain does not get better or if it gets worse.

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CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.