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Can acid reflux disease be treated with medications?

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In many cases, lifestyle changes combined with over-the-counter medications are all you need to control the symptoms of acid reflux disease.

Antacids, such as Alka-Seltzer, Maalox, Mylanta, Rolaids, or Riopan, can neutralize the acid from your stomach. However, they may cause diarrhea or constipation, especially if you overuse them. It's best to use antacids that contain both magnesium hydroxide and aluminum hydroxide. When combined, they may help counteract these gastrointestinal side effects.

From: What Is Acid Reflux Disease? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC): "Heartburn, Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER), and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease."

Cleveland Clinic: "GERD or Acid Reflux or Heartburn." 

The American College of Gastroenterology: "Heartburn or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Gastroesophageal reflux disease and heartburn."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Heartburn: Hints on Dealing With the Discomfort."

FDA: "LINX Reflux Management System."

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

SOURCES: 

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC): "Heartburn, Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER), and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease."

Cleveland Clinic: "GERD or Acid Reflux or Heartburn." 

The American College of Gastroenterology: "Heartburn or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Gastroesophageal reflux disease and heartburn."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Heartburn: Hints on Dealing With the Discomfort."

FDA: "LINX Reflux Management System."

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

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What medications are used to treat acid reflux disease?

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