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How is squamous cell carcinoma treated?

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  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) can usually be treated with minor surgery that can be done in a doctor’s office or hospital clinic. Depending on the size and location of the SCC, your doctor may choose to use any of the following techniques to remove it: Excision: cutting out the cancer spot and some healthy skin around it
  • Surgery using a small hand tool and an electronic needle to kill cancer cells
  • Mohs surgery: excision and then inspecting the excised skin using a microscope
  • Lymph node surgery: remove a piece of the lymph node; uses general anesthesia
  • Dermabrasion: "sanding" your affected area of skin with a tool to make way for a new layer
  • Cryosurgery: freezing of the spot using liquid nitrogen
  • Topical chemotherapy: a gel or cream applied to the skin
  • Targeted drug treatment

From: Squamous Cell Carcinoma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society.

Duke University Medicine: “Types of skin cancer.”

National Cancer Institute.

John Hopkins Medicine.

American Academy of Dermatology.

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on February 12, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society.

Duke University Medicine: “Types of skin cancer.”

National Cancer Institute.

John Hopkins Medicine.

American Academy of Dermatology.

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on February 12, 2019

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How can you protect yourself from squamous cell carcinoma?

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