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How is scleroderma treated?

ANSWER

There’s no treatment for scleroderma, but you can manage the symptoms with:

  • NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like ibuprofen or aspirin to ease swelling and pain.
  • Steroids and other drugs to control your immune response. These can help with muscle, joint, or internal organ problems.
  • Drugs that boost blood flow to your fingers
  • Blood pressure medication
  • Drugs that open blood vessels in the lungs or prevent tissue from scarring
  • Heartburn medication

You can try:

  • Exercise for better health
  • Skin treatment, including light and laser therapy
  • Physical therapy
  • Occupational therapy
  • Stress management
  • If severe organ damage happens, organ transplantation

SOURCES: 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. 

Scleroderma: Etiology, Goldman: Cecil Medicine, 24th ed.

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on March 6, 2020

SOURCES: 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. 

Scleroderma: Etiology, Goldman: Cecil Medicine, 24th ed.

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on March 6, 2020

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What other things may help scleroderma?

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