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  • Question 1/8

    You have to take the “morning after” pill before noon the next day to prevent pregnancy.

  • Answer 1/8

    You have to take the “morning after” pill before noon the next day to prevent pregnancy.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Despite the nickname, you have several days to take emergency contraception, or levonorgestrel, which is available over the counter. You can take the Plan B One-Step brand or the generic version up to 72 hours later. Next Choice and Ella work for up to 120 hours afterward. Hormones in the pill keep your body from ovulating. You can also use it right after you have sex -- you don’t have to wait until the next day.

  • Answer 1/8

    How do birth control pills affect your risk of cancer?

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    • Correct Answer:

    The longer you take the pill, the more likely you are to get cervical cancer. But it can also cut your chances of getting ovarian cancer in half.

  • Question 1/8

    Once you hit 50, it’s safe to go off the pill.

  • Answer 1/8

    Once you hit 50, it’s safe to go off the pill.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Doctors define menopause as 12 months in a row without a period. Until you hit that milestone, it’s possible you could get pregnant. And if you’re on the pill, the hormones in it may be what’s causing your lack of periods, not menopause. Talk to your doctor.

  • Question 1/8

    Using a male condom and a female condom at the same time gives extra pregnancy protection.

  • Answer 1/8

    Using a male condom and a female condom at the same time gives extra pregnancy protection.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It seems like two condoms would double the protection, but don’t do it. Using a male and female condom at the same time during sex boosts your risk of pregnancy. The friction between the two can rip or break them.

  • Answer 1/8

    This method is most likely to result in a baby:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Even if you get the timing exactly right (which isn’t easy), pulling out leaves a lot to chance. The sperm in pre-ejaculation fluid can fertilize an egg even if the man doesn’t ejaculate. As many as 28 out of 100 women get pregnant using this method.

  • Question 1/8

    Add this for protection from sexually transmitted diseases:

  • Answer 1/8

    Add this for protection from sexually transmitted diseases:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Male condoms are the only way to lower your odds of getting diseases like gonorrhea, syphilis, and HIV when you have sex with an infected partner. Doctors are trying to figure out how well the female condom works as a protection against STDs and HIV.

  • Question 1/8

    How long after sex can sperm live inside a woman’s body?

  • Answer 1/8

    How long after sex can sperm live inside a woman’s body?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Once they’re released into your body, they get cozy. They can hang around for up to 3 days in your reproductive tract. Even if you don’t ovulate until a couple of days after you have unprotected sex, you could still get pregnant.

  • Question 1/8

    You can’t get pregnant while you’re breastfeeding.

  • Answer 1/8

    You can’t get pregnant while you’re breastfeeding.

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    • Correct Answer:

    It isn’t a foolproof birth control method. Only a few moms who breastfeed will ovulate by the time their baby is 6 months old. But more than half will be back in the egg-making business by the time baby turns 1. At least half of those moms -- that’s about a third of all breastfeeding women -- have the right hormone balance to get pregnant.

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    Don’t let a lack of knowledge be a barrier to better sexual health. Brush up on your birth control info.

Sources | Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on May 26, 2016 Medically Reviewed on May 26, 2016

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on
May 26, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Getty

SOURCES:

Princeton University: “Emergency Contraception: A Last Chance to Prevent Unintended Pregnancy.”

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: “The Facts About Emergency Contraception.”

National Cancer Institute: “Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk.”

American Cancer Society: “Ovarian Cancer.”

Healthy Women: “Ask the Expert.”

U.S. Department of Health and Human Affairs: “Female Condom: The Facts.”

Mayo Clinic: “Withdrawal Method.”

American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology: “Birth Control Especially for Teens.”

Office on Women’s Health: “Birth Control Methods,” “Trying to Conceive.”

Bouchard, T. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine , 2013

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