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    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES

    Other Names:

    Collagen Hydrolysate, Collagen Peptidesi, Collagène Dénaturé, Collagène Hydrolysé, Collagène Marin Hydrolysé, Denatured Collagen, Hydrolised Collagen, Hydrolysed Collagen, Hydrolyzed Collagen, Hydrolyzed Collagen Protein, Marine Collagen Hydroly...
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    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Overview
    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Uses
    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Side Effects
    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Interactions
    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Dosing
    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Overview Information

    Collagen peptides are small proteins from animal products.

    Collagen peptides are used for aging skin, osteoporosis, brittle nails, muscle strength, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses.

    Don't confuse collagen peptides with collagen type I (native), collagen type II (native), or gelatin.

    How does it work?

    Collagen peptides are very small pieces of collagen. Collagen is one of the materials that make up cartilage, bone, and skin. When taken by mouth, collagen peptides seems to build up in the skin and cartilage. This may help improve some skin and joint conditions.

    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

    Possibly Effective for:

    • Aging skin. Taking collagen peptides by mouth seems to improve skin hydration and skin elasticity in older people. Taking collagen peptides might also lessen wrinkles, but this benefit is probably only modest.
    • Osteoarthritis. Taking collagen peptides by mouth may slightly relieve pain and improve joint function in people with knee osteoarthritis. It may take about 3-5 months of daily treatment before benefit is seen.

    Insufficient Evidence for:

    • Eczema (atopic dermatitis). Early research shows that taking collagen peptides for 12 weeks might improve symptoms and severity of eczema. But not all collagen peptides seem to help.
    • Brittle nails. Early research shows that taking collagen type I peptides might improve brittle nails. It seems to increase nail growth and reduce broken nails compared to baseline.
    • Diabetes. Early research shows that taking collagen peptides from fish might reduce blood sugar in people with diabetes.
    • Muscle soreness caused by exercise. Early research shows that taking collagen peptides from cow hide before intense exercise doesn't seem to reduce muscle soreness.
    • High blood pressure. Taking collagen peptides by mouth might lower blood pressure. But not all research agrees.
    • Joint pain. Taking collagen peptides by mouth might reduce knee pain during exercise in younger athletes. It's unclear if collagen peptides reduce joint pain in older adults without osteoarthritis.
    • Muscle strength. Early research shows that taking collagen peptides in addition to resistance exercise might improve hand-grip strength more than resistance exercise alone. But it doesn't seem to improve leg strength.
    • Obesity. Early research shows that taking collagen peptides slightly reduces fat in overweight people.
    • Low bone mass (osteopenia). Taking collagen peptides for 12 months might improve low bone mass in the spine and hip.
    • Pressure ulcers. Early research shows that taking collagen peptides might improve healing of pressure ulcers.
    • Age-related muscle loss (sarcopenia). Early research shows that taking type I collagen peptides might improve strength in elderly men with age-related muscle loss.
    • Sprains. Early research in athletes with past ankle sprains shows that taking collagen peptides might increase ankle stability. But it doesn't seem to improve ankle stiffness.
    • Painful conditions caused by overuse of tendons (tendinopathy). Early research shows that taking collagen peptides in addition to exercise might improve tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon.
    • Wound healing. Early research shows that taking collagen peptides might reduce skin redness and improve moisture and elasticity after laser-removal of skin.
    • Skin wrinkles from sun damage. Some early research shows that collagen peptides might reduce wrinkles and improve skin moisture in women with skin wrinkles from sun damage.
    • Strengthening bones and joints.
    • Dry skin.
    • Weak and brittle bones (osteoporosis).
    • Other conditions.

    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Side Effects & Safety

    When taken by mouth: Collagen peptides are POSSIBLY SAFE. There's some evidence that collagen peptides in doses up to 10 grams daily can be safely used for up to 5 months. Side effects are rare.

    Special Precautions & Warnings:

    Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the safety of collagen peptides when used in medicinal amounts during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Interactions What is this?

    We currently have no information for COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Interactions

    COLLAGEN PEPTIDES Dosing

    The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

    BY MOUTH:

    • For aging skin: Usually, 2.5-10 grams of collagen peptides have been taken by mouth daily for 8-12 weeks. Specific products that have shown some benefit in clinical research include Peptan-F or Peptan-P by Rousselot, Wellnex by Nitta Gelatin, and VERISOL by Gelita AG. Combination products containing collagen peptides and other ingredients that have shown some benefit include Gold Collagen Active by Minerva Research Labs and BioCell Collagen by BioCell Technology.
    • For osteoarthritis: 10 grams of collagen peptides taken daily in one or two divided doses has been used for 3-5 months. A specific combination product containing collagen peptides and other ingredients (BioCell Collagen by BioCell Technology) has been used in a dose of 1 gram twice daily for up to 10 weeks.

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    Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

    This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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