PHENETHYLAMINE

OTHER NAME(S):

1-Amino-2-phenylethane, 2-Phenethylamine, 2-Phenylethylamine, Benzeneethanamine, Beta-phenethylamine, Beta-phenylethylamine, PEA, Phenethylamine HCl, Phenethylamine Hydrochloride, Phenylethylamine.

Overview

Overview Information

Phenethylamine is a chemical that is found naturally in the body. It can also be made in the laboratory.

Phenethylamine is taken by mouth for improving athletic performance, depression, weight loss, and to improve mood and attention.

How does it work?

Phenethylamine stimulates the body to make certain chemicals that play a role in depression and other psychiatric conditions. People who don’t make enough phenethylamine naturally may be helped by taking phenethylamine as a supplement. However, too much phenethylamine might cause side effects similar to the drug amphetamine.
Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Depression. Early research shows that taking 10-60 mg of phenethylamine by mouth per day along with 5 mg of the antidepressant selegiline (Anipryl, Eldepryl) twice per day for 4 weeks relieves depression in 60% of people. Of the people who respond to initial treatment with phenethylamine plus selegiline, 86% show continued depression relief when treated for up to 50 weeks.
  • Attention.
  • Mood.
  • Weight loss.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate phenethylamine for these uses.
Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Phenethylamine is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for most people when taken by mouth appropriately. Phenethylamine works similar to the drug amphetamine, and may cause similar side effects. Also, it might cause rapid heart rate, anxiety, or agitation.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the safety of using phenethylamine during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bipolar disorder: Use of phenethylamine might cause people with bipolar disorder to convert from depression to mania.

Schizophrenia: Use of phenethylamine might worsen symptoms of schizophrenia, including hallucinations or delusions.

Surgery: Phenethylamine might affect the central nervous system. This could interfere with surgery. Stop taking phenethylamine at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for PHENETHYLAMINE Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of phenethylamine depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for phenethylamine. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Antelman SM, Edwards DJ, Lin M. Phenethylamine: evidence for a direct, postsynaptic dopamine-receptor stimulating action. Brain Res. 1977;127(2):317-322. View abstract.
  • Bailey B, Philips S, Boulton A. In vivo release of endogenous dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and some of their metabolites from rat caudate nucleus by phenylethylamine. Neurochem Res. 1987;12(2):173-8. View abstract.
  • Baker G, Bornstein R, Rouget A, et al. Phenylethylaminergic mechanisms in attention-deficit disorder. Biol Psychiatry. 1991;29(1):15-22. View abstract.
  • Baker GB, Coutts RT, Rao TS. Neuropharmacological and neurochemical properties of N-(2-cyanoethyl)-2-phenylethylamine, a prodrug of 2-phenylethylamine. Br J Pharmacol. 1987;92(2):243-55. View abstract.
  • Beck O, Helander A, Karlson-Stiber C, et al. Presence of phenylethylamine in hallucinogenic Psilocybe mushroom: possible role in adverse reactions. J Anal Toxicol. 1998;22(1):45-9. View abstract.
  • Bergman J, Yasar S, Winger G. Psychomotor stimulant effects of beta-phenylethylamine in monkeys treated with MAO-B inhibitors. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2001;159(1):21-30. View abstract.
  • Birdsall TC. 5-Hydroxytryptophan: A Clinically-Effective Serotonin Precursor. Altern Med Rev 1998;3:271-80. View abstract.
  • Figueiredo T, Viegas R, Lara L, et al. Bioactive amines and internal quality of commercial eggs. Poult Sci. 2013;92(5):1376-84. View abstract.
  • Granvogl M, Bugan S, Schieberle P. Formation of amines nad aldehydes from parent amino acids during thermal processing of cocoa and model systems: new insights into pathways of the strecker reaction. J Agric Food Chem. 2006;54(5):1730-9. View abstract.
  • Grimsby J, Toth M, Chen K, et al. Increased stress response and beta-phenylethylamine in MAOB-deficient mice. Nat Genet. 1997;17(2):206-10. View abstract.
  • Kim B, Byun B, Mah J. Biogenic amine formation and bacterial contribution in Natto products. Food Chem. 2012;135(3):2005-11. View abstract.
  • Kusaga A, Yamashita Y, Koeda T, et al. Increased urine phenylethylamine after methylphenidate treatment in children with ADHD. Ann Neurol. 2002;52(3):372-4. View abstract.
  • Kusaga A. [Decreased beta-phenylethylamine in urine of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autistic disorder]. No To Hattatsu. 2002;34(3):243-8. View abstract.
  • Lindemann L, Hoener MC. A renaissance in trace amines inspired by a novel GPCR family. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2005;26(5):274-81. View abstract.
  • Lukasik-Glebocka M, Sommerfeld K, Tezyk A, et al. [Acute poisoning with weight-loss dietary supplement falsely suggesting the use of amphetamine]. Przegl Lek. 2013;70(10):880-3. View abstract.
  • Mantegazza P, Riva M. Amphetamine-like activity of beta-phenethylamine after a monoamine oxidase inhibitor in vivo. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. 1963;151(1):472-8.
  • Marcobal A, De las Rivas B, Landete J, et al. Tyramine and phenylethylamine biosynthesis by food bacteria. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2012;52(5):448-67. View abstract.
  • Miller G. The emerging role of trace amine-associated receptor 1 in the functional regulation of monoamine transporters and dopaminergic activity. J Neurochem. 2011;116(2):164-76. View abstract.
  • Minchin RF, Barber HE, Ilett KF. Effect of prolonged desmethylimipramine administration on the pulmonary clearance of 5-hydroxytryptamine and beta-phenylethylamine in rats. Drug Metab Dispos. 1982;10(4):356-60. View abstract.
  • Nakamura M, Ishii A, Nakahara D. Characterization of beta-phenyltheylamine-induced monoamine release in rat nucleus accumbens: a microdialysis study. Eur J Pharmacol. 1998;349(2-3):163-9. View abstract.
  • Paterson I, Juorio A, Boulton A. 2-Phenylethylamine: a modulator of catecholamine transmission in the mammalian central nervous system? J Neurochem. 1990;55(6):1827-37. View abstract.
  • Pessione E, Pessione A, Lamberti C, et al. First evidence of a membrane-bound, tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine producing, tyrosine decarboxylase in Enterococcus faecalis: a two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic study. 2009;9(10):2695-710. View abstract.
  • Philips S, Rozdilsky B, Boulton A. Evidence for the presence of m-tyramine, p-tyramine, tryptamine, and phenylethylamine in the rat brain and several areas of the human brain. Biol Psychiatry. 1978;13(1):51-7. View abstract.
  • Sabelli H, Fink P, Fawcett J, et al. Sustained antidepressant effect of PEA replacement. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1996;8(2):168-71. View abstract.
  • Sabelli HC, Javaid JI. Phenylethlyamine modulation of affect: therapeutic and diagnostic implications. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 1995;7(1):6-14. View abstract.
  • Shannon H, Cone E, Yousefnejad D. Physiologic effects and plasma kinetics of beta-phenylethylamine and its N-methyl homolog in the dog. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1982;223(1):190-6. View abstract.
  • Singhal AB, Caviness VS, Begleiter AF, et al. Cerebral vasoconstriction and stroke after use of serotonergic drugs. Neurology 2002;58:130-3. View abstract.
  • Smith T. Phenethylamine and related compounds in plants. Phytochemistry. 1977;16(1):9-18.
  • Szabo A, Billett E, Turner J. Phenylethylamine, a possible link to the antidepressant effects of exercise? Br J Sports Med. 2001;35(5):342-3. View abstract.
  • Xie Z, Miller G. Beta-phenylehtylamine alters monoamine transporter function via trace amine-associated receptor 1: implication for modulatory roles of trace amines in brain. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2008;325(2):617-28. View abstract.
  • Antelman SM, Edwards DJ, Lin M. Phenethylamine: evidence for a direct, postsynaptic dopamine-receptor stimulating action. Brain Res. 1977;127(2):317-322. View abstract.
  • Bailey B, Philips S, Boulton A. In vivo release of endogenous dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and some of their metabolites from rat caudate nucleus by phenylethylamine. Neurochem Res. 1987;12(2):173-8. View abstract.
  • Baker G, Bornstein R, Rouget A, et al. Phenylethylaminergic mechanisms in attention-deficit disorder. Biol Psychiatry. 1991;29(1):15-22. View abstract.
  • Baker GB, Coutts RT, Rao TS. Neuropharmacological and neurochemical properties of N-(2-cyanoethyl)-2-phenylethylamine, a prodrug of 2-phenylethylamine. Br J Pharmacol. 1987;92(2):243-55. View abstract.
  • Beck O, Helander A, Karlson-Stiber C, et al. Presence of phenylethylamine in hallucinogenic Psilocybe mushroom: possible role in adverse reactions. J Anal Toxicol. 1998;22(1):45-9. View abstract.
  • Bergman J, Yasar S, Winger G. Psychomotor stimulant effects of beta-phenylethylamine in monkeys treated with MAO-B inhibitors. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2001;159(1):21-30. View abstract.
  • Birdsall TC. 5-Hydroxytryptophan: A Clinically-Effective Serotonin Precursor. Altern Med Rev 1998;3:271-80. View abstract.
  • Figueiredo T, Viegas R, Lara L, et al. Bioactive amines and internal quality of commercial eggs. Poult Sci. 2013;92(5):1376-84. View abstract.
  • Granvogl M, Bugan S, Schieberle P. Formation of amines nad aldehydes from parent amino acids during thermal processing of cocoa and model systems: new insights into pathways of the strecker reaction. J Agric Food Chem. 2006;54(5):1730-9. View abstract.
  • Grimsby J, Toth M, Chen K, et al. Increased stress response and beta-phenylethylamine in MAOB-deficient mice. Nat Genet. 1997;17(2):206-10. View abstract.
  • Kim B, Byun B, Mah J. Biogenic amine formation and bacterial contribution in Natto products. Food Chem. 2012;135(3):2005-11. View abstract.
  • Kusaga A, Yamashita Y, Koeda T, et al. Increased urine phenylethylamine after methylphenidate treatment in children with ADHD. Ann Neurol. 2002;52(3):372-4. View abstract.
  • Kusaga A. [Decreased beta-phenylethylamine in urine of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autistic disorder]. No To Hattatsu. 2002;34(3):243-8. View abstract.
  • Lindemann L, Hoener MC. A renaissance in trace amines inspired by a novel GPCR family. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2005;26(5):274-81. View abstract.
  • Lukasik-Glebocka M, Sommerfeld K, Tezyk A, et al. [Acute poisoning with weight-loss dietary supplement falsely suggesting the use of amphetamine]. Przegl Lek. 2013;70(10):880-3. View abstract.
  • Mantegazza P, Riva M. Amphetamine-like activity of beta-phenethylamine after a monoamine oxidase inhibitor in vivo. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. 1963;151(1):472-8.
  • Marcobal A, De las Rivas B, Landete J, et al. Tyramine and phenylethylamine biosynthesis by food bacteria. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2012;52(5):448-67. View abstract.
  • Miller G. The emerging role of trace amine-associated receptor 1 in the functional regulation of monoamine transporters and dopaminergic activity. J Neurochem. 2011;116(2):164-76. View abstract.
  • Minchin RF, Barber HE, Ilett KF. Effect of prolonged desmethylimipramine administration on the pulmonary clearance of 5-hydroxytryptamine and beta-phenylethylamine in rats. Drug Metab Dispos. 1982;10(4):356-60. View abstract.
  • Nakamura M, Ishii A, Nakahara D. Characterization of beta-phenyltheylamine-induced monoamine release in rat nucleus accumbens: a microdialysis study. Eur J Pharmacol. 1998;349(2-3):163-9. View abstract.
  • Paterson I, Juorio A, Boulton A. 2-Phenylethylamine: a modulator of catecholamine transmission in the mammalian central nervous system? J Neurochem. 1990;55(6):1827-37. View abstract.
  • Pessione E, Pessione A, Lamberti C, et al. First evidence of a membrane-bound, tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine producing, tyrosine decarboxylase in Enterococcus faecalis: a two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic study. 2009;9(10):2695-710. View abstract.
  • Philips S, Rozdilsky B, Boulton A. Evidence for the presence of m-tyramine, p-tyramine, tryptamine, and phenylethylamine in the rat brain and several areas of the human brain. Biol Psychiatry. 1978;13(1):51-7. View abstract.
  • Sabelli H, Fink P, Fawcett J, et al. Sustained antidepressant effect of PEA replacement. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1996;8(2):168-71. View abstract.
  • Sabelli HC, Javaid JI. Phenylethlyamine modulation of affect: therapeutic and diagnostic implications. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 1995;7(1):6-14. View abstract.
  • Shannon H, Cone E, Yousefnejad D. Physiologic effects and plasma kinetics of beta-phenylethylamine and its N-methyl homolog in the dog. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1982;223(1):190-6. View abstract.
  • Singhal AB, Caviness VS, Begleiter AF, et al. Cerebral vasoconstriction and stroke after use of serotonergic drugs. Neurology 2002;58:130-3. View abstract.
  • Smith T. Phenethylamine and related compounds in plants. Phytochemistry. 1977;16(1):9-18.
  • Szabo A, Billett E, Turner J. Phenylethylamine, a possible link to the antidepressant effects of exercise? Br J Sports Med. 2001;35(5):342-3. View abstract.
  • Xie Z, Miller G. Beta-phenylehtylamine alters monoamine transporter function via trace amine-associated receptor 1: implication for modulatory roles of trace amines in brain. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2008;325(2):617-28. View abstract.

More Resources for PHENETHYLAMINE

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