CAPRYLIC ACID

OTHER NAME(S):

Octanoate, Octanoic Acid.

Overview

Overview Information

Caprylic acid is a medium-chain fatty acid that is found in palm oil, coconut oil, and the milk of humans and bovines.

Caprylic acid is taken by mouth for epilepsy, tremors, renal failure, digestive disorders, and leakage of a body fluid (chyle) into the space between the lungs and chest wall.

How does it work?

Caprylic acid is sometimes given to people as part of a test used to measure gastric emptying.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Digestive disorders.
  • Epilepsy.
  • Leakage of a body fluid (chyle) into the space between the lungs and chest wall.
  • Renal failure.
  • Tremors.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate caprylic acid for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Caprylic acid is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in food amounts or when used at approved doses for nutritional supplementation and in tests to measure stomach emptying. It can cause some side effects, including nausea, bloating, and diarrhea.

Caprylic acid is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as part of a ketogenic diet or a diet high in medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) under the guidance of a physician.

Caprylic acid is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth by people with a condition known as medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency. People with this condition are not able to break down caprylic acid appropriately. This can lead to increased levels of caprylic acid in the blood, which may increase the risk of comas.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if it is safe to use caprylic acid when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Liver disease: Caprylic acid is broken down by the liver. There is some concern that people with liver disease might not be able to break down caprylic acid. This might cause blood levels of caprylic acid to increase. However, other research suggests that people with liver disease are still able to break down caprylic acid. Until more is known, use with caution.

Low blood pressure (hypotension): Caprylic acid can lower blood pressure. In theory, caprylic acid might cause blood pressure to go too low if used by people prone to low blood pressure. Use with caution. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency: People with MCAD deficiency are not able to break down caprylic acid appropriately. This can lead to increased levels of caprylic acid in the blood, which might increase the risk of comas. Avoid using.

Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency: People with MCAD deficiency are not able to break down caprylic acid appropriately. This can lead to increased levels of caprylic acid in the blood, which might increase the risk of comas. Avoid using.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for CAPRYLIC ACID Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of caprylic acid depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for caprylic acid. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

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  • Sills MA, Forsythe WI, Haidukewych D, et al. The medium chain triglyceride diet and intractable epilepsy. Arch Dis Child 1986;61:1168-72. View abstract.
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  • Vining EPG, Freeman JM, Ballaban-Gill K, et al. A multicenter study of the efficacy of the ketogenic diet. Arch Neurol 1998;55:1433-7. View abstract.
  • Vossen R, Beckeringh TE, Dorland L, Bruinvis L, Wadman SK. Octanoylglucuronide excretion in patients with a defective oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids. Clin Chim Acta 1985 Nov 15;152(3):253-60. View abstract.
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  • Charbrol B, Mancini J, Bertrand C, et al. [Generalized epilepsy disclosing medium-chain-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency]. Arch Fr Pediatr 1993;50(6):497-500. View abstract.
  • Duran M, Mitchell G, de Klerk JB, et al. Octanoic acidemia and octanoylcarnitine excretion with dicarboxylic aciduria due to defective oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids. J Pediatr 1985;107(3):397-404. View abstract.
  • Duran, M., Mitchell, G., de Klerk, J. B., de Jager, J. P., Hofkamp, M., Bruinvis, L., Ketting, D., Saudubray, J. M., and Wadman, S. K. Octanoic acidemia and octanoylcarnitine excretion with dicarboxylic aciduria due to defective oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids. J Pediatr 1985;107(3):397-404. View abstract.
  • Gregersen N, Rosleff F, Kolvraa S, et al. Non-ketotic C6-C10-dicarboxylic aciduria: biochemical investigations of two cases. Clin Chim Acta 1980;102(2-3):179-89. View abstract.
  • Haubenberger D, McCrossin G, Lungu C, et al. Octanoic acid in alcohol-responsive essential tremor: a randomized controlled study. Neurology. 2013;80(10):933-40. View abstract.
  • Hayball PF, Holman JW, Nation RL. Influence of octanoic acid on the reversible protein binding of ketorolac enantiomers to human serum albumin (HSA): comparative liquid chromatographic studies using a HSA chiral stationary phase. J Chromatogr B Biomed Appl 1994;662(1):128-33. View abstract.
  • Hopkins IJ, Lynch BC. Use of ketogenic diet in epilepsy in childhood. Aust Paediatr J 1970;6:25-9.
  • Hoshimoto A, Suzuki Y, Katsuno T, et al. Caprylic acid and medium-chain triglycerides inhibit IL-8 gene transcription in Caco-2 cells: comparison with the potent histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. Br J Pharmacol 2002;136(2):280-6. View abstract.
  • Huttenlocher PR, Wilbourn AJ, Signore JM. Medium-chain triglycerides as a therapy for intractable childhood epilepsy. Neurology 1971;21(11):1097-1103. View abstract.
  • Kinsman SL, Vining EP, Quaskey SA, et al. Efficacy of the ketogenic diet for intractable seizure disorders: review of 58 cases. Epilepsia 1992;33(6):1132-6. View abstract.
  • Kristev A, Mitkov D, Lukanov Y, Chapkynov P. The effect of octanoic fatty acid on the cardiovascular system of the guinea pig. Cor Vasa 1989;31(4):321-7. View abstract.
  • Kuhara T, Matsumoto I, Ohno M, Ohura T. Identification and quantification of octanoyl glucuronide in the urine of children who ingested medium-chain triglycerides. Biomed Environ Mass Spectrom 1986;13(11):595-8. View abstract.
  • Liefaard G, Heineman E, Molenaar JC, Tibboel D. Prospective evaluation of the absorptive capacity of the bowel after major and minor resections in the neonate. J Pediatr Surg 1995;30(3):388-91. View abstract.
  • Massolini G, Aubry AF, McGann A, Wainer IW. Determination of the magnitude and enantioselectivity of ligand binding to rat and rabbit serum albumins using immobilized-protein high performance liquid chromatography stationary phases. Biochem Pharmacol 1993;46(7):1285-93. View abstract.
  • Noctor TA, Wainer IW, Hage DS. Allosteric and competitive displacement of drugs from human serum albumin by octanoic acid, as revealed by high-performance liquid affinity chromatography, on a human serum albumin-based stationary phase. J Chromatogr 1992;577(2):305-15. View abstract.
  • Robinson MK, Whittle E, Basketter DA. A two-center study of the development of acute irritation responses to fatty acids. Am J Contact Dermat 1999;10(3):136-45. View abstract.
  • Robinson MK. Population differences in acute skin irritation responses. Race, sex, age, sensitive skin and repeat subject comparisons. Contact Dermatitis 2002;46(2):86-93. View abstract.
  • Schwartz RH, Eaton J, Bower BD. Ketogenic diets in the treatment of epilepsy: short-term clinical effects. Dev Med Child Neurol 1989;31:145-51. View abstract.
  • Sills MA, Forsythe WI, Haidukewych D, et al. The medium chain triglyceride diet and intractable epilepsy. Arch Dis Child 1986;61:1168-72. View abstract.
  • Traul KA, Driedger A, Ingle DL, Nakhasi D. Review of the toxicologic properties of medium-chain triglycerides. Food Chem Toxicol 2000;38(1):79-98. View abstract.
  • van de Casteele M, Luypaerts A, Geypens B, et al. Oxidative breakdown of octanoic acid is maintained in patients with cirrhosis despite advanced disease. Neurogastroenterol Motil 2003;15(2):113-20. View abstract.
  • Vining EPG, Freeman JM, Ballaban-Gill K, et al. A multicenter study of the efficacy of the ketogenic diet. Arch Neurol 1998;55:1433-7. View abstract.
  • Voller B, Lines E, McCrossin G, et al. Dose-escalation study of octanoic acid in patients with essential tremor. J Clin Invest. 2016;126(4):1451-7. View abstract.
  • Vossen R, Beckeringh TE, Dorland L, Bruinvis L, Wadman SK. Octanoylglucuronide excretion in patients with a defective oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids. Clin Chim Acta 1985 Nov 15;152(3):253-60. View abstract.
  • Wheaton TA, Stewart I. The distribution of tyramine, N-methyltyramine, hordenine, octopamine, and synephrine in higher plants. Lloydia 1970;33(2):244-54. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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