METHIONINE

OTHER NAME(S):

DL-Methionine, DL Methionine, DL-Méthionine, L-2-amino-4-(methylthio)butyric acid, L-Methionine, L-Méthionine, Méthionine, Metionina.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Methionine is an amino acid. Amino acids are the building blocks that our bodies use to make proteins. Methionine is found in meat, fish, and dairy products. It plays an important role in the many functions within the body.

Methionine by commonly taken by mouth to treat liver disorders and viral infections along with many other uses. But there is limited scientific research that supports these uses.

How does it work?

In acetaminophen poisoning, methionine prevents the breakdown products of acetaminophen from damaging the liver. It may also act as an antioxidant and help to protect damaged tissues.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Effective for

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol) poisoning. Research shows that taking methionine by mouth seems to be effective for treating acetaminophen poisoning. Treatment should begin as quickly as possible but must start within 10 hours of acetaminophen overdose.

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Breast Cancer. Eating higher amounts of methionine may be linked to a lower risk of breast cancer.
  • Colon cancer. Eating a diet rich in methionine and folate, a type of B vitamin, seems to help reduce the chance of colon cancer. This seems to be especially true for people with a family history of colon cancer and people who drink large amounts of alcohol.
  • Neural tube birth defects. Women who eat more methionine during pregnancy seem to have a lower risk of neural tube birth defects.
  • Parkinson's disease. Early research suggests that taking L-methionine by mouth for up to 6 months improves symptoms of Parkinson's disease, such as tremor, inability to control movements, and rigidity.
  • Hot flashes. Early research suggests that taking methionine doesn’t decrease hot flashes in postmenopausal women.
  • Herpes simplex virus (HSV).
  • Shingles (herpes zoster).
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV).
  • Pancreatitis (inflamed pancreas).
  • Liver function.
  • Depression.
  • Alcoholism.
  • Allergies.
  • Asthma.
  • Radiation side effects.
  • Schizophrenia.
  • Drug withdrawal.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of methionine for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Methionine is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts commonly found in foods. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth or given intravenously (by IV) under the supervision of a healthcare professional. In some people, methionine may cause headache, heartburn, nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, or drowsiness.

Don’t treat yourself with methionine. It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to use methionine by mouth or intravenously to self-medicate. Too much methionine can cause brain damage and death. Methionine can increase blood levels of homocysteine, a chemical that may cause heart disease. Methionine might also promote the growth of some tumors.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children: Methionine is LIKELY SAFE for children when given by mouth in amounts commonly found in foods. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when given by IV, but only under the supervision of a healthcare professional. Methionine is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when given by IV into infants who are also receiving parenteral nutrition (nutrition through the vein).

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Methionine is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts commonly found in foods. But there is not enough information about the safety of taking methionine in larger doses than those commonly found in foods. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Acidosis: Methionine can cause changes in acidity of the blood and should not be used in people with a condition called acidosis.

“Hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis): There is some concern that methionine might make atherosclerosis worse. Methionine can increase blood levels of a chemical called homocysteine, especially in people who don’t have enough folate, vitamin B12, or vitamin B6 in their bodies, or in people whose bodies have trouble processing homocysteine. Too much homocysteine is linked to an increased risk for diseases of the heart and blood vessels.

Liver disease, including cirrhosis: Methionine might make liver disease worse.

Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency: This is an inherited disorder. It changes the way the body processes homocysteine. People who have this disorder should not take methionine supplements because methionine might cause homocysteine to build up in these people. Too much homocysteine might increase the chance of developing diseases of the heart or blood vessels.

Schizophrenia: Large doses of methionine (e.g., 20 g/day for 5 days) might cause confusion, disorientation, delirium, agitation, listlessness, and other similar symptoms in people with schizophrenia.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for METHIONINE Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

ADULTS

BY MOUTH:

  • For acetaminophen (Tylenol) poisoning: 2.5 grams of methionine every 4 hours for 4 doses.

View References

REFERENCES:

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More Resources for METHIONINE

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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