Overview

Terminalia is a tree. Three species of terminalia are used for medicine, especially as part of Ayurvedic medicine. These species are Terminalia arjuna, Terminalia bellirica, and Terminalia chebula.

Terminalia is most commonly used for heart ailments including heart failure and chest pain. It is also used for diabetes, high cholesterol, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work ?

Terminalia contains ingredients that help stimulate the heart. It might also help the heart by lowering cholesterol and blood pressure.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Possibly Effective for

  • Chest pain (angina). Some research shows that taking Terminalia by mouth with conventional medications improves symptoms in people experiencing chest pain after a heart attack. Other research shows that taking Terminalia by mouth improves symptoms and reduces the need for chest pain medication in people with long-term chest pain.
There is interest in using terminalia for a number of other purposes, but there isn't enough reliable information to say whether it might be helpful.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Terminalia arjuna is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth for 3 months or less. But don't use Terminalia arjuna without medical supervision. It might affect your heart.

There isn't enough reliable information to know if other species of Terminalia, including Terminalia bellirica or Terminalia chebula, are safe. It's best to avoid use until more is known.

Special Precautions and Warnings

When taken by mouth: Terminalia arjuna is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth for 3 months or less. But don't use Terminalia arjuna without medical supervision. It might affect your heart.

There isn't enough reliable information to know if other species of Terminalia, including Terminalia bellirica or Terminalia chebula, are safe. It's best to avoid use until more is known. Pregnancy: There is some evidence that Terminalia arjuna is POSSIBLY UNSAFE during pregnancy. There isn't enough reliable information to know if the other species of Terminalia are safe to use when pregnant. Stay on the safe side and avoid using any Terminalia species.

Breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if Terminalia is safe to use when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: Terminalia might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Diabetes: Terminalia might lower blood sugar levels. Your diabetes medications might need to be adjusted by your healthcare provider.

Surgery: Terminalia might interfere with blood sugar control and increase the risk of bleeding during surgery. Stop taking Terminalia at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions ?

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with TERMINALIA

    Terminalia might lower blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking Terminalia along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. But more evidence is needed to know if this interaction is a big concern. Monitor your blood sugar closely.

    Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase),

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with TERMINALIA

    Terminalia might slow blood clotting. Taking Terminalia along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

  • Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates) interacts with TERMINALIA

    Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Some research suggests that Terminalia arjuna might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications, although other species of Terminalia might not have this effect. Taking Terminalia along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might change the effects and side effects of some medications.

    Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), diazepam (Valium), zileuton (Zyflo), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Voltaren), fluvastatin (Lescol), glipizide (Glucotrol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), phenytoin (Dilantin), piroxicam (Feldene), tamoxifen (Nolvadex), tolbutamide (Tolinase), torsemide (Demadex), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

  • Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) substrates) interacts with TERMINALIA

    Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Some research suggests that Terminalia arjuna might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications, although other Terminalia species might not have this effect. Taking Terminalia along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might change the effects and side effects of some medications.
    Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), clozapine (Clozaril), codeine, desipramine (Norpramin), donepezil (Aricept), fentanyl (Duragesic), flecainide (Tambocor), fluoxetine (Prozac), meperidine (Demerol), methadone (Dolophine), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), olanzapine (Zyprexa), ondansetron (Zofran), tramadol (Ultram), trazodone (Desyrel), and others.

  • Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) interacts with TERMINALIA

    Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Some research suggests that Terminalia arjuna might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications, although other Terminalia species might not have this effect. Taking Terminalia along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might change the effects and side effects of some medications.
    Some medications that are changed by the liver include lovastatin (Mevacor), clarithromycin (Biaxin), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), diltiazem (Cardizem), estrogens, indinavir (Crixivan), triazolam (Halcion), and many others.

  • Omeprazole (Prilosec) interacts with TERMINALIA

    The body breaks down omeprazole to get rid of it. Terminalia chebula might decrease how quickly the body breaks down omeprazole. Taking Terminalia chebula along with omeprazole might increase the effects and side effects of omeprazole.

  • Chlorzoxazone (Parafon Forte, Paraflex) interacts with TERMINALIA

    The body breaks down chlorzoxazone to get rid of it. Terminalia chebula might decrease how quickly the body breaks down chlorzoxazone. Taking Terminalia along with chlorzoxazone might increase the effects and side effects of chlorzoxazone.

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For chest pain (angina): 500 mg of the powdered bark of Terminalia arjuna has been taken three times per day along with conventional treatment for chest pain for up to 3 months.
View References

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2020.