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    Schizophrenia: Encouraging Someone to Take the Medicines

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    Here are ways to help your family member take the medicines:

    • Talk about medicines in a way that is meaningful to the person. For example, point out the reasons to take medication. Say, "Your medicines help quiet the voices you hear," or "Your medicines help you study and keep your grades up." Link taking the medicines with things that the person enjoys.
    • Give the person options about what to do if he or she wants to stop taking medicines. Talk with his or her health professional about what the options are. Make changes in the medicine routine only after consulting with the health professional. And keep records about these changes and their effects.
    • Ask how the person is doing with the medicine treatment. Say, "How many pills do you have left?" instead of "Are you taking your pills the way you should?"
    • Talk with the person about any side effects experienced from the medicines. Take any complaints seriously and see whether there is anything that you can do to help or that can be done differently.
    • Help plan for relapses even if your family member continues to take the medicines as prescribed. Relapses are part of the illness.
    • Accept the fact that some people will not take medicine as they should even with a lot of support. Do not tie your concern and caring to whether your loved one takes the medicines. For those who won't or are unable to take daily medicines, injections may be a good option. Discuss injections with your health professional to see whether they may be right for the person with schizophrenia.

    If you need help encouraging your family member to take prescribed medicines, talk with a health professional who can tell you more about the expected results of taking the medicines, what side effects to look for, and how to manage them.

    Recommended Related to Schizophrenia

    Schizophrenia and Your Brain

    People who have schizophrenia may hear voices or see things that aren’t real. But what happens inside the brain of someone who has schizophrenia? Scientists are working to understand that. They’ve found that people who have the disorder may be more likely to have glitches in their genes that may disrupt brain development. There’s another key brain difference. Studies show that certain brain chemicals that control thinking, behavior, and emotions are either too active or not active enough in people...

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    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: November 14, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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