Medicines During Pregnancy - Overview

Doctors usually tell women to avoid medicines during pregnancy, if possible, especially during the first 3 months. That is when a baby's organs form. But sometimes you have to take medicine to treat a health problem, such as high blood pressure or asthma.

Before prescribing any medicine, your doctor or nurse-midwife will look at whether the risk of taking medicine is higher than the risk of not treating your illness. If you or your baby would face worse problems without treatment, then your doctor or nurse-midwife will prescribe medicine or recommend an over-the-counter one. He or she will also look at which medicine to give you. For example, some antibiotics are safe for pregnant women, and some are not.

What medicines can you take during pregnancy?

It can be hard to know if a medicine is safe for your baby. Most medicines are not studied in pregnant women, because researchers worry about how the medicines might affect the baby. But some medicines have been taken for so long by so many women that doctors have a good idea of how safe they are.

In general, doctors say it is usually safe to take:

If you are planning a pregnancy, talk to your doctor or nurse-midwife about any medicines you are taking, including over-the-counter ones. Some of them may be safe during pregnancy. But others may not be safe. Your doctor or nurse-midwife may have you stop taking a medicine or may switch you to another one. Some medicines that aren't safe in the first trimester may be safe to use later in the pregnancy.

What medicines should you avoid during pregnancy?

Some medicines are known to increase the chance of birth defects or other problems. But sometimes, stopping a medicine (such as one that controls seizures) has greater risk to the mother and the baby than continuing to take the medicine. Talk to your doctor about any medicines you take if you are thinking about having a baby or if you have just found out that you are pregnant.

Among the medicines that increase the chances of birth defects are:

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Is it okay to take herbal supplements and vitamins?

Talk to your doctor or nurse-midwife about any herbal supplements that you have been taking. Don't take any vitamins or herbal or other supplements unless you talk with your doctor or nurse-midwife first.

Women who are trying to get pregnant and those who are pregnant should take a multivitamin that has folic acid. Folic acid is especially important prior to and in the first few weeks of pregnancy, because it prevents some birth defects. You can get folic acid in an over-the-counter multivitamin or in a multivitamin that your doctor or nurse-midwife prescribes. Talk to your doctor or nurse-midwife about which type of vitamin you should take. In some cases, doctors and nurse-midwives prescribe extra iron or extra folic acid.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.

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