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    Multiple Myeloma

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Multiple Myeloma is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    • Kahler disease
    • myelomatosis
    • plasma cell myeloma

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • extramedullary plasmacytoma
    • nonsecretory myeloma
    • osteosclerotic myeloma
    • plasma cell leukemia
    • smoldering myeloma
    • solitary plasmacytoma of bone

    General Discussion

    Multiple myeloma is a rare form of cancer (1% of malignancy) characterized by excessive production (proliferation) and improper function of certain cells (plasma cells) found in the bone marrow. Plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell, are produced in the bone marrow and normally reside there. Excessive plasma cells may eventually mass together to form a tumor or tumors in various sites of the body, especially the bone marrow. If only a single tumor is present, the term solitary plasmacytoma is used. When multiple tumors are present, the term multiple myeloma is used. Plasma cells are a key component of the immune system and secrete a substance known as immunoglobulin proteins (M-proteins), a type of antibody. Antibodies are special proteins that the body produces to combat invading microorganisms, toxins, or other foreign substances. Overproduction of plasma cells in affected individuals results in abnormally high levels of these proteins within the body, referred to as M proteins

    Major symptoms of multiple myeloma may include bone pain, especially in the back and the ribs; low levels of circulating red blood cells (anemia) resulting in weakness, fatigue, and lack of color (pallor); and kidney (renal) abnormalities. In some cases, affected individuals are more susceptible to bacterial infections such as pneumonia. The cause of multiple myeloma is unknown.

    Resources

    Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
    1311 Mamaroneck Avenue
    Suite 310
    White Plains, NY 10605
    Tel: (914)949-5213
    Fax: (914)949-6691
    Tel: (800)955-4572
    Email: infocenter@LLS.org
    Internet: http://www.LLS.org

    International Myeloma Foundation
    12650 Riverside Drive
    Suite 206
    North Hollywood, CA 91607
    USA
    Tel: (818)487-7455
    Fax: (818)487-7454
    Tel: (800)452-2873
    Email: TheIMF@myeloma.org
    Internet: http://www.myeloma.org

    American Cancer Society, Inc.
    250 Williams NW St
    Ste 6000
    Atlanta, GA 30303
    USA
    Tel: (404)320-3333
    Tel: (800)227-2345
    TDD: (866)228-4327
    Internet: http://www.cancer.org

    National Cancer Institute
    6116 Executive Blvd Suite 300
    Bethesda, MD 20892-8322
    USA
    Tel: (301)435-3848
    Tel: (800)422-6237
    TDD: (800)332-8615
    Email: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www.cancer.gov

    NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute ~ Hematology Branch
    10 Center Dr, Building 10-CRC
    3-5140, MSC-1202
    Bethesda, MD 20892-1202
    Tel: (301)496-5093
    Fax: (301)496-8396
    Tel: (800)644-2337
    Email: YoungNS@mail.nih.gov
    Internet: http://dir.nhlbi.nih.gov/labs/hb/index.asp?

    Cancer Research UK
    Angel Building
    407 St John Street
    London, EC1V 4AD
    United Kingdom
    Tel: 020 7242 0200
    Fax: 02071216700
    Email: cancerhelpuk@cancer.org.uk
    Internet: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-help/

    Rare Cancer Alliance
    1649 North Pacana Way
    Green Valley, AZ 85614
    USA
    Internet: http://www.rare-cancer.org

    Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
    383 Main Avenue
    5th Floor
    Norwalk, CT 06851
    USA
    Tel: (203)229-0464
    Fax: (203)229-0572
    Email: info@themmrf.org
    Internet: http://www.themmrf.org/

    Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
    PO Box 8126
    Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
    Tel: (301)251-4925
    Fax: (301)251-4911
    Tel: (888)205-2311
    TDD: (888)205-3223
    Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

    Patient Registries at Slone: Myeloma & MDS
    Slone Epidemiology Center
    1010 Commonwealth Avenue
    Boston, MA 02215
    Fax: (617)738-5119
    Tel: (800)231-3769
    Email: registry@slone.bu.edu
    Internet: http://www.bu.edu/prs

    Friends of Cancer Research
    1800 M Street NW
    Suite 1050 South
    Washington, DC 22202
    Tel: (202)944-6700
    Email: info@focr.org
    Internet: http://www.focr.org

    Cancer.Net
    American Society of Clinical Oncology
    2318 Mill Road Suite 800
    Alexandria, VA 22314
    Tel: (571)483-1780
    Fax: (571)366-9537
    Tel: (888)651-3038
    Email: contactus@cancer.net
    Internet: http://www.cancer.net/

    Cancer Support Community
    1050 17th St NW Suite 500
    Washington, DC 20036
    Tel: (202)659-9709
    Fax: (202)974-7999
    Tel: (888)793-9355
    Internet: http://www.cancersupportcommunity.org/

    Lance Armstrong Foundation
    2201 E. Sixth Street
    Austin, TX 78702
    Tel: (512)236-8820
    Fax: (512)236-8482
    Tel: (877)236-8820
    Email: media@livestrong.org
    Internet: http://www.livestrong.org

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 3/15/2013
    Copyright 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2010, 2013 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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