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News Related to Diabetes

  1. Experts: Give Statins to All People With Diabetes

    By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Dec. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) call for giving the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins to all people with diabetes to help prevent heart disease. These new standards bring the associ

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  2. Asians Need Diabetes Screening at Lower Body Weight

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Dec. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is a big contributor to type 2 diabetes, but Asian-Americans may need to pile on fewer excess pounds to develop the disease than other groups do, according to new guidelines from the American Diabetes Association

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  3. Some Blood Types Might Raise Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    By Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Dec. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In what scientists say is a first, a new analysis suggests that some blood types place women at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. How much higher? According to a team of French researchers, women with blood type

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  4. Type 1 Diabetes on the Rise in Children

    Dec. 17, 2014 -- More children in the U.S. are getting type 1 diabetes, according to new research. A recent study by Jean Lawrence, ScD, MPH, found a large rise in the disease among non-Hispanic white children. From 2002 to 2009, the number of kids with type 1 diabetes rose from 24 per 100,000 to 27

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  5. Dairy & Diabetes Risk: New Thinking?

    Dec. 5, 2014 -- Some intriguing new research shows that dairy foods, perhaps even high-fat ones, may play a role in type 2 diabetes prevention. Although experts say it’s too soon to draw clear conclusions, the findings seem to run counter to current advice to people with diabetes, who are generally

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  6. Midlife Diabetes Linked to Memory Problems Later

    By Kathleen Doheny HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Dec. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A midlife diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes may raise the risk of memory and thinking problems over the next 20 years, new research suggests. Having diabetes in midlife was linked with a 19 percent greater decline in m

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  7. Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

    By Kathleen Doheny HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a serving a day of yogurt may lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. "The data we have gathered show that yogurt consumption can have significant benefit in reducing the risk of dia

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  8. Exercise May Not Help Type 2 Blood Sugar Control

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genes might prevent regular exercise from improving blood sugar control in up to a fifth of people with type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. The issue has long been pondered by doctors working with diabetic pat

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  9. Type 1 Diabetes Lowered Survival in Study

    By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with type 1 diabetes faced a much higher risk of dying over the course of a 14-year study than people without the disease, Swedish researchers report. The good news was that the closer someone with type 1 diabete

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  10. Nearly 3 in 10 With Diabetes Don't Know It: Study

    By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Nov. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 8 million Americans have diabetes but don't know it, a new study shows. That's despite the fact that about two-thirds of those with undiagnosed diabetes have seen a doctor two or more times in the past year, accord

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 1005 Articles Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next >>

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Normal
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If the level is below 70 or you are experiencing symptoms such as shaking, sweating or difficulty thinking, you will need to raise the number immediately. A quick solution is to eat a few pieces of hard candy or 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey. Recheck your numbers again in 15 minutes to see if the number has gone up. If not, repeat the steps above or call your doctor.

People who experience hypoglycemia several times in a week should call their health care provider. It's important to monitor your levels each day so you can make sure your numbers are within the range. If you are pregnant always consult with your health care provider.

Congratulations on taking steps to manage your health.

However, it's important to continue to track your numbers so that you can make lifestyle changes if needed. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Your level is high if this reading was taken before eating. Aim for 70-130 before meals and less than 180 two hours after meals.

Even if your number is high, it's not too late for you to take control of your health and lower your blood sugar.

One of the first steps is to monitor your levels each day. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

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