Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Food & Recipes

Font Size
A
A
A

What's Really in Your Food

THE CLAIM: "Contains omega-3s"

When a package bears the word contains before any nutrient, the food must contain at least 10 percent of the daily value of that nutrient per serving, says Blake. When it comes to omega-3 fatty acids, it's also important to know which type of omega-3 the food contains. DHA and EPA — the omega-3 fats found in fish — are the ones most commonly linked to a lower risk of heart disease.

  • Bottom line: You can trust any contains claims. If a food doesn't specify which omega-3 it offers, check the ingredient list.

Originally published on July 9, 2008

Related content on redbookmag.com

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

fresh smoothie
Recipes
breakfast
Recipes
 
grilled chicken salad
Recipes
Butternut squash soup
Tool
 

WebMD Recipe Finder

Browse our collection of healthy, delicious recipes, from WebMD and Eating Well magazine.



bread
Recipes
soup
Recipes
 
roasted chicken
Recipes
variety of beans
Recipes
 
vegetarian sandwich
Recipes
fresh vegetables
Recipes
 
smoothie
fitArticle
Foods To Boost Mens Heath Slideshow
Slideshow
 

WebMD Special Sections