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Aortic Valve Stenosis - Cause

Most people who have aortic valve stenosis are born with a normal, healthy aortic valve camera.gif but develop aortic stenosis late in life. Aging and calcium buildup cause the leaflets of the valve to thicken and harden, preventing the valve from opening properly. Typically, stenosis develops slowly over many years.

Most young people and teens who have aortic valve stenosis developed it from a congenital heart defect. The most common heart defect that causes aortic stenosis is a bicuspid aortic valve camera.gif.

Some people may develop aortic stenosis after having rheumatic fever as a child. It usually takes 30 to 40 years after a case of rheumatic fever for aortic stenosis to develop. Rheumatic fever has been rare in the United States since the 1970s.

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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: April 30, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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