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Picking the Right Osteoporosis Medicine for You

Here are 6 types of osteoporosis medicine to consider.
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WebMD Feature

When it's time to choose an osteoporosis medicine, you have lots of options. In the past 10 years, science has come a long way in helping women treat their bone problems.

First step: Make sure you're getting adequate calcium and vitamin D, advises Eve Scopelitis, MD, an internist with Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans. "Vitamin D is now being recognized as a key player in osteoporosis. Even though patients are taking calcium plus D, they may not be getting enough D. They may need prescription vitamin D -- it's that important.

Recommended Related to Osteoporosis

Osteopenia Treatment

Osteopenia is a term used to describe bone density that is somewhat lower than normal -- but not low enough to be diagnosed as osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a condition in which thinning bones become so fragile that they are prone to fracture easily. A person who has osteopenia is at risk for osteoporosis and may benefit from treatments to strengthen bone.

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In fact, even when you start taking osteoporosis medicine, it's critical to keep getting these supplements, says Holly Thacker, MD, director of the Women's Health Center at The Cleveland Clinic. "A postmenopausal woman needs 1,500 milligrams calcium daily, plus 1,000 units of vitamin D. Some need prescription-strength vitamin D [Calcitriol]. This deficiency is a serious problem."

Also critical: Do weight-bearing exercise, don't smoke, and if you drink alcohol, drink moderately.

Second step: Talk to your doctor about getting a bone resorption marker test -- a blood or urine test, advises Mary Ruppe, MD, an endocrinologist with the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston.

Bone resportion is bone loss -- and the test will tell you whether your osteoporosis medicine is having an effect on bone loss, she explains. "The first test is your baseline. Get it before you start the medication. Then get it checked after you've taken the drug for a few months to see the change." Insurance typically covers two tests the first year.

Now let's weigh the advantages and disadvantages of six main types of osteoporosis medicine.

No. 1: Bisphosphonates: Fosamax, Actonel, Boniva, Zoledronic Acid (Reclast or Zometa)

Bisphosphonates are the mainstays of osteoporosis medicines today. "They're the workhorses of osteoporosis treatment," says Bobo Tanner, MD, director of the Osteoporosis Clinic at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. "They offer an enormous number of options for patients."

Fosomax was the first FDA-approved osteoporosis medicine 10 years ago, followed by Actonel three years later. Boniva, and Reclast are the most recent FDA approvals. 

What They Do: All these drugs have been shown to increase bone density -- and Fosamax and Actonel lower the risk of spine and hips fractures. Actonel has been shown to work quickly, reducing fracture risk within the first six months, Thacker reports.

"Boniva has not yet been shown to reduce hip fractures, and that's a concern," she adds.

Reclast or Zometa increase bone mineral density and have been shown to reduce spine fractures and hip fractures -- with the reduced spine fracture risk sustained over three years. According to the manufacturer, Reclast also reduces fractures of the wrist, arm, leg, and rib. Reclast has been shown to reduce mortality in people who have already had hip fractures, Thacker tells WebMD.

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Osteoporosis Glossary

  • Bone Mineral Density - A measurement of the amount of calcium and minerals in bone tissue.
  • Calcium - A mineral in (and vital to) your bones. If your body lacks calcium, it takes it from bones.
  • DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) - a test used to measure bone mineral density.
  • Osteoporosis - A decrease in bone density, which increase the risk of fractures.
  • Vitamin D - A vitamin that helps your body absorb calcium.
  • View All Terms

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