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    Osteomyelitis

    Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone, a rare but serious condition. Bones can become infected in a number of ways: Infection in one part of the body may spread through the bloodstream into the bone, or an open fracture or surgery may expose the bone to infection.

    What Causes Osteomyelitis?

    In most cases, a bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus, a type of staph bacteria, causes osteomyelitis.

    Certain chronic conditions like diabetes may increase your risk for osteomyelitis.

    Who Gets Osteomyelitis?

    Only 2 out of every 10,000 people get osteomyelitis. The condition affects children and adults, although in different ways. Certain conditions and behaviors that weaken the immune system increase a person's risk for osteomyelitis, including:

    Bone surgery, including hip and knee replacements, also increase the chance of bone infection.

    Osteomyelitis in Children and Adults

    In children, osteomyelitis is usually acute. Acute osteomyelitis comes on quickly, is easier to treat, and overall turns out better than chronic osteomyelitis. In children, osteomyelitis usually shows up in arm or leg bones.

    In adults, osteomyelitis can be either acute or chronic. People with diabetes, HIV, or peripheral vascular disease are more prone to chronic osteomyelitis, which persists or recurs, despite treatment. Whether chronic or acute, osteomyelitis often affects an adult's pelvis or vertebrae of the spine. It can also occur in the feet, especially in a person with diabetes.

    Symptoms of Osteomyelitis

    Acute osteomyelitis develops rapidly over a period of seven to 10 days. The symptoms for acute and chronic osteomyelitis are very similar and include:

    • Fever, irritability, fatigue
    • Nausea
    • Tenderness, redness, and warmth in the area of the infection
    • Swelling around the affected bone
    • Lost range of motion

    Osteomyelitis in the vertebrae makes itself known through severe back pain, especially at night.

    Osteomyelitis Treatment

    Figuring out if a person has osteomyelitis is the first step in treatment. It's also surprisingly difficult. Doctors rely on X-rays, blood tests, MRI, and bone scans to get a picture of what's going on. A bone biopsy is necessary to confirm a diagnosis of osteomyelitis. This also helps determine the type of organism, typically bacteria, causing the infection so the right medication can be prescribed.

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