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    Prostate Cancer and 'Watchful Waiting' Approach

    European study tracked how many men came back for regular checkups over 13 years

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Dennis Thompson

    HealthDay Reporter

    THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors often recommend no treatment at all when a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer, opting instead to keep a close eye on the slow-growing tumor and acting only when it becomes aggressive.

    But a new, long-term European study says this strategy, called "active surveillance," has a major flaw -- if men don't come back for regular checkups, doctors won't be able to tell if their prostate cancer becomes life-threatening.

    A quarter of prostate cancer patients participating in a Swiss active surveillance study didn't bother showing up for their recommended appointments, lead researcher Dr. Lukas Hefermehl reported to the annual meeting of the European Association of Urology, held this month in Stockholm.

    "These findings leave us with a practical and ethical dilemma," Hefermehl, a urologist at Kantonsspital Baden, in Switzerland, said in an association news release. "We often recommend that men go onto an active surveillance program, but these results indicate that more than a quarter of men will disappear from the system."

    Active surveillance -- also known as "watchful waiting" -- is a pragmatic treatment strategy derived from two known facts about prostate cancer.

    First, prostate cancer grows so slowly in most men that they are likely to die from other causes. Second, the surgery and radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer often cause impotence, incontinence and other side effects that affect the man's quality of life.

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men other than skin cancer, according to the American Cancer Society, but the 15-year survival rate for prostate cancer is an impressive 94 percent.

    As a result, many doctors have concluded it's better to leave the prostate cancer alone and only act if it accelerates.

    This new study followed 157 men during 13 years of active surveillance.

    Researchers found that after 13 years, about 28 percent of all patients required treatment because their prostate cancer flared up. Nearly all the men were cured of their prostate cancer, with an overall group survival rate of 94 percent.

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