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Emergency contraception is safe, works well, and should now be available to anyone who needs it.

But you have to know where to find it. The FDA has changed the rules about how pharmacies sell some types of emergency contraception. Before you walk into a drugstore, learn more about what's available.

How Can I Get Emergency Contraception?

There are several versions of emergency contraception. How you get them falls into three categories.

1. Only one emergency contraceptive drug is available without a prescription and with no age restrictions:

Plan B One-Step. This drug should be in the family planning aisle of your pharmacy, along with the condoms. It comes as a single pill. Anyone should be able to buy it without a prescription. But your pharmacy may not sell it that way yet. “We anticipate the process will be gradual and hope to see it more widely available soon,” says Denise Bradley, vice president of corporate communications at Teva Pharmaceuticals, which makes Plan B One-Step.

2. Several drugs are available without prescription but only to people age 17 and older:

  • My Way and Next Choice One Dose. These are generic versions of the drug in Plan B One-Step, levonorgestrel. They come as a single pill. Both should be in the family planning aisle, but you'll have to show ID to buy them. If you're under 17, you'll need a prescription.
  • Double-dose generic levonorgestrel. The double-dose just means it's two pills instead of one. Otherwise, it's the same as single-dose versions. Confusingly, double-dose levonorgestrel is still behind the pharmacy counter, not in the aisle. Why? It's what the FDA allows. Again, people under 17 need a prescription.

3. Treatments that you can get only by prescription:

  • Combination pills. This is a name for taking a higher dose of regular birth control pills. Whatever your age, you need a prescription. Don’t take extra doses of your regular birth control pills without talking to your doctor.
  • Ella. No matter your age, you need a prescription for Ella.
  • IUD. The copper-T IUD, a small device that's placed in your uterus, also requires a prescription. A doctor will have to insert it for you. Also, research shows that Plan B One-Step starts to lose its effectiveness in women heavier than 165 pounds and is not recommend for anyone over this weight. Instead, a copper-T IUD is the suggested option for emergency contraception in this group.