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    Birth Control Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Birth Control

    1. Progestin-Only Hormonal Methods (Mini-Pills, Implants, and Shots)

      Drug details for Progestin-only hormonal methods (mini-pills, shots).

    2. Birth Control - Topic Overview

      What is the shot? The shot is used to prevent pregnancy. You get the shot in your upper arm or rear end (buttocks). The shot gives you a dose of the hormone progestin. The shot is often called by its brand name, Depo-Provera.Progestin prevents pregnancy in these ways: It thickens the mucus in the cervix. This makes it hard for sperm to travel into the uterus. It also thins the lining of the uterus, which makes it harder for a fertilized egg to attach to the uterus. Progestin can sometimes stop the ovaries from releasing an egg each month (ovulation).The shot provides birth control for 3 months at a time. You then need another shot. The shot can cause bone loss. Most women can use it safely for up to 2 years and then may choose to switch to another form of birth control. Some women may be able to use the shot for more than 2 years.How well does it work?In the first year of use:1When the shot is used exactly as directed, fewer than 1 woman out of 100 has an unplanned pregnancy. When the

    3. Birth Control - Topic Overview

      The vaginal contraceptive sponge is a barrier method of birth control. It contains a spermicide called nonoxynol-9 that is released over the 24 hours that the sponge may be left in the vagina. The sponge also blocks the cervix so sperm can't pass. It can be inserted immediately before intercourse or up to 24 hours before. It is left in place for 6 hours after intercourse. Effectiveness in ...

    4. Birth Control - Topic Overview

      The female condom is a tube of soft plastic with a closed end. Both ends have a ring or rim. The ring at the closed end is inserted deep into the vagina over the cervix,like a diaphragm,to hold the tube in place. The ring at the open end remains outside the opening of the vagina. A new female condom is used with each act of sexual intercourse. It can be inserted up to 8 hours before sexual ...

    5. Contraceptive Sponge for Birth Control - Emergency Contraception

      You can use emergency contraception if a condom breaks, you've forgotten a pill, you are taking other medications that may affect contraception medications, or you have had unprotected sex. Emergency contraception does not protect against sexually transmitted diseases.There are two kinds of emergency contraception:Hormonal emergency contraception. Even though it is called the "morning - after ...

    6. Contraceptive Sponge for Birth Control - Topic Overview

      Some medicines can interfere with how birth control pills work. For example,you may not be protected from pregnancy while you are taking other medicines that affect liver metabolism. The vaginal ring and skin patch contain combination hormones and may also interact with some medicines. The progestin-only pills,implant (Implanon),and shot (Depo-Provera) also contain hormones that may ...

    7. Birth Control - Birth Control Methods

      There are many methods of birth control. Learn about the different kinds of birth control to help you choose the best one for you. When making your choice, also consider that only a condom will protect you from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). To protect yourself and your partner against STDs, use a condom (along with your chosen birth control method) every time you have sex.Hormonal ...

    8. Contraceptive Sponge for Birth Control - When to Call a Doctor

      Different birth control methods have different side effects and possible complications. It is important to understand the risks of the birth control method you use. Talk to your health professional if you have concerns about side effects.Call your health professional if you have symptoms of pregnancy, such as having missed one or more periods or having your period but with a lot less bleeding ...

    9. Birth Control - Choosing a Birth Control Method

      With so many methods available and so many factors to consider, choosing birth control can be difficult. You may be able to decide on a method by asking yourself the following questions. Might I want to have a biological child in the future?One of your first considerations might be to determine whether you want permanent or temporary birth control. In other words, you should consider whether you .

    10. Birth Control - Topic Overview

      What is birth control?Birth control, also called contraception, is any method used to prevent pregnancy. It allows you to choose whether or when to have a child. Most women can become pregnant from the age when they start their menstrual periods until their late 40s or early 50s. During the many years before menopause, using birth control is key to avoiding an unplanned pregnancy. Which birth ...

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