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Birth Control Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Birth Control

  1. Topic Overview

    Some medicines can interfere with how birth control pills work. For example,you may not be protected from pregnancy while you are taking other medicines that affect liver metabolism. The vaginal ring and skin patch contain combination hormones and may also interact with some medicines. The progestin-only pills,implant (Implanon),and shot (Depo-Provera) also contain hormones that may ...

  2. Topic Overview

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are spread by sexual contact involving the genitals, mouth, or rectum, and can also be spread from a pregnant woman to her fetus before or during delivery. STDs, which affect both men and women, are a worldwide public health concern. While most STDs can be cured, some cannot, including HIV (which causes AIDS), genital herpes, and human papillomavirus (HPV), ...

  3. Your Choices

    Some birth control methods work around the clock. Others work only when you use them, which means it's so very important to use them every time you have sex.Birth control methodsAbstinence. Not having sex (abstinence) is the most effective method of birth control and sexually transmitted infection (STI) protection.Barrier methods. The diaphragm, the cap, and male or female condoms are examples of barrier methods. They block the sperm from fertilizing an egg. You use one each time you have sex. And condoms also protect you from STIs. The pill, patch, or vaginal ring. These methods have hormones that stop you from releasing an egg each month (ovulation). You can choose to take a pill at the same time every day, change a patch every week, or change a ring every 3 weeks.Birth control shots. The shot contains hormones that prevent pregnancy for 3 months. You see your doctor every 3 months for the shot.Hormone implants. The implant, which is about the size of a matchstick, is put under

  4. Deciding What's Right for You

    Birth control—without it, pregnancy can happen. That's why you need birth control you can count on. There are lots of good options for birth control. Your best choices are those that you find easy to use—so you never go without it. And of course, no matter what kind of birth control you use, you always need a plan for protecting yourself against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

  5. How to Decide

    Choosing birth control is a very personal thing. First, think through some basic facts about your birth control options. Then, focus in on what's important to you. And then, think about who you are and what your style is.How well does each birth control method protect me?Some methods depend on you and how well you use them—every time. These include hormone pills or the hormone patch or ring. The same is true for the condom, sponge, diaphragm, or cap. Some methods work very well for long periods of time without you having to do anything. These include the hormone implant or shot, and the IUD.Only a condom protects you from STIs. Abstinence depends on your commitment to not have sex. Not having vaginal intercourse prevents pregnancy. And not having oral sex, anal sex, or vaginal sex prevents STIs.Is it easy to keep with me?Some methods easily fit in your bag. These include hormone pills or a condom, sponge, diaphragm, or cap.Some methods don't have to be carried around at all. These

  6. Myth or Truth?

    A friend told me that you can't get pregnant if you haven't had a period at all, or even lately.Don't believe it! You make an egg, or ovulate, and then have a period. And ovulation can happen at any time. There's no day of the month when it's safe to have sex without birth control.I heard a guy say that having birth control means you'll say yes to sex at any time.Having protection against pregnancy and STIs means that it's there when you need it. But being prepared doesn't mean having to say yes unless you're comfortable with it.My sister told me you don't need birth control if you just douche after having sex.Flushing water into the vagina, or douching, after sex does not prevent pregnancy. I need to feel safe with my sex partner and with what we're doing together. It's got to be okay to say 'no' or 'stop' at any time. This should always be true. It's important that you be able to say no or stop at any time.I should be able to count on my partner to have a condom.Every time? Anyone

  7. Topic Overview

    The cervical cap is a barrier method of birth control. A cervical cap,which is made of rubber,fits tightly over the opening to the uterus (the cervix). It is used with a spermicide. You can insert the cap ahead of time or just before sex. To work best,the cap should be left in place for 6 hours after sex. Do not leave it in for more than 48 hours total. If you have sex more than one time ...

  8. How to Get Birth Control

    From a storeYou can buy birth control without going to a doctor. You can get male condoms in grocery stores, convenience stores, or drugstores. And you can get female condoms or a sponge and spermicide from a drugstore.You can buy emergency contraception without a prescription at most drugstores if you are 15 or older. From a doctorAt a doctor's office, you can get:A hormone shot. A hormone implant. An IUD. A fitted diaphragm or cervical cap.A prescription for hormone pills, patches, or rings. A prescription for emergency contraception, if you are younger than 15.From abstinenceWhen you use abstinence for preventing pregnancy:Know what you want and how you feel before things get sexual. Remember why you chose abstinence. Think about your reasons and why they are important to you. How you feel and what you believe matter.Think ahead. Try to avoid getting into situations where staying abstinent could be hard.Don't abuse alcohol or drugs. Alcohol and drugs can affect your decisions. They

  9. Missing Birth Control Pills

    Forget to take your birth control pills? Find out from WebMD.

  10. Topic Overview

    The levonorgestrel (LNg) intrauterine device (IUD) releases small amounts of levonorgestrel,a form of progesterone,into the uterus each day. This type of IUD reduces cramping and heavy menstrual bleeding. And it is a highly effective method of birth control. It must be replaced every 5 years to ensure that hormone release continues at a level that helps you. How well does it work? Most ...

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