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VANADIUM

Other Names:

Atomic number 23, Metavanadate, Métavanadate, Orthovanadate, Pentoxyde de Vanadium, Sulfate de Vanadyl, V, Vanadate, Vanadio, Vanadium Pentoxide, Vanadyl, Vanadyl Nicotinate, Vanadyl Sulfate, Vanadyl Sulphate.

VANADIUM Overview
VANADIUM Uses
VANADIUM Side Effects
VANADIUM Interactions
VANADIUM Dosing
VANADIUM Overview Information

Vanadium is a mineral. It was named for the Norse goddess of beauty, Vanadis, because of its beautiful colors. Vanadium supplements are used as medicine.

Vanadium is used for treating diabetes, low blood sugar, high cholesterol, heart disease, tuberculosis, syphilis, a form of “tired blood” (anemia), and water retention (edema); for improving athletic performance in weight training; and for preventing cancer.

How does it work?

There is some evidence that vanadium might act like insulin, or help to increase the effects of insulin.

VANADIUM Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Likely Effective for:

  • Preventing vanadium deficiency, a condition in which the body doesn’t have enough vanadium.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Diabetes. There is some evidence that high doses of vanadyl sulfate (100 mg daily, providing 31 mg elemental vanadium) might improve the way people with type 2 diabetes use insulin, the hormone that processes sugar. The study suggested that high-dose vanadium might lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. But there are two big concerns about this study. First, it only involved 40 people, so the conclusions need to be confirmed using a bigger study group. Secondly, even if high-dose vanadium works for diabetes, these high doses, used long-term, might not be safe. It's not known if lower doses work as well. For now, don’t use vanadium to treat type 2 diabetes. Wait to see if additional larger studies show benefit and safety.
  • Heart disease.
  • High cholesterol.
  • Water retention (edema).
  • Preventing cancer.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of vanadium for these uses.


VANADIUM Side Effects & Safety

Vanadium is LIKELY SAFE in adults, if less than 1.8 mg per day is taken. At higher doses, such as those used to treat diabetes, vanadium frequently causes unwanted side effects including abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, nausea, and gas. It can also cause a greenish tongue, loss of energy, and problems with the nervous system.

Vanadium is UNSAFE when used in large amounts and for a long time. This increases the risk of serious side effects including kidney damage.

Vanadium might lower blood sugar. People with diabetes should check their blood sugar carefully and watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia).

Vanadium is LIKELY SAFE in children when taken in amounts found in foods. Don’t give children supplements. Not enough is known about the safety of these larger doses in children.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, limit your intake of vanadium to the amount found in food. Not enough is known about the safety of taking larger doses.

Diabetes: The vanadyl sulfate form of vanadium might lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Monitor your blood sugar carefully.

Kidney problems: There is developing evidence that vanadium might harm the kidneys. If you have kidney disease, don’t use vanadium supplements.

VANADIUM Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with VANADIUM

    Vanadium seems to decrease blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking vanadium along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

    Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with VANADIUM

    Vanadium might slow blood clotting. Taking vanadium along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.


VANADIUM Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • People get vanadium from food and from supplements. An average diet provides 6 to 18 mcg of vanadium per day. The various vanadium supplements contain a different amount of vanadium, depending on the chemical compound used. For example, vanadyl sulfate contains 31% elemental vanadium; sodium metavanadate contains 42% elemental vanadium; and sodium orthovanadate contains 28% elemental vanadium.
  • The National Institute of Medicine has set the tolerable upper intake level (UL) of vanadium, the highest intake amount for which no unwanted side effects are expected, at 1.8 mg per day of elemental vanadium for adults. No UL has been set for infants, children, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. In these groups, vanadium intake should be limited to food or infant formula.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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